Centrul Astra Film

 

 

Astra Film Festival

Film catalogue

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • Tadzhik Buffet

    Mairam, Safar and Goulle are filmmakers from Tadzhikistan, the easternmost of the former centralasian sovjet republics, bordering made to Dunshanbe and meet with them. Our trip to Tadzhikistan coincided with great social and political turmoil. The countrz was at the brink of civil war. The citz of Dushanbe had turned into a war cramp. Fundamentalist islamic group tried their strength against procommunist forces. Bz the time we left in the begining of Maz the first serious fighting has started. Our film follows our friends in their worries about the ongoing political situation. As filmmakers thez cannot make films. Thez do not want to engage themselves in a religious war. Perhaps thez have to leave Tadzhikistan to make a new start some other place. But were to go? ...

  • Task

    On the green bank of a river, an old Cuban watchman talks to the filmmaker about the future and how he was meant to advise young people. The man starts to direct the conversation, entering into a constant dialogue with the camera. A cinema vérité documentary with fixed frames, fairy tale colors and verbal dynamics illustrating the differences between generations. ...

  • Techsquat

    Exploring the idea of self-imposed limitations as boosts to inspiration, “Techsquat” observes five twenty-something- year old entrepreneurs in their day-to- day activities, as they design and negotiate the rules and boundaries of their lives. Trying to make their own miniature Silicon Valley, the young men move in together in a small apartment in Prague, where they want to create a focused environment of cooperation and creativity. Without glamorizing the start-up industry, the film breaks down the fourth wall to present a glimpse into a generation. Eager for action and change, the characters try to carve out a place in the world for themselves while being confronted with societal ideals of independence and masculinity. With endearing dose of irony and humor “Techsquat” is essentially the universal story of self-creation and transitioning into new roles and stages of life. ...

  • Teodora Sinner

    Christian Orthodox nuns in a Romanian monastery call each other "little mother". They have given up the eartlhly life and all the traps that come with it, to be wedded to the Eternal Being. "God my sovereign, it is You I seek each and every morning. I hunger for You, and my body and soul tremble for You…" This is a film about the most beautiful among the „little mothers” her marriage to God. ...

  • Terms And Conditions May Apply

    The concept of privacy seems to belong to the past, as experts on technology and social sciences try to convince us in this documentary. Whenever we set up an email account or update software, we click on an "I agree" button. But how many of us have ever actually read the terms and conditions? We provide confirmation to large corporations like Facebook and Google and by extension to national governments, which can then monitor us in real time. But can we accept potentially being expelled from a country for making a joke on Twitter about terrorism? The film chronologically charts the transformation of US legislation, which goes hand-in-hand with ever-evolving technologies for storing large amounts of data, bringing our lives closer to an Orwellian dystopia. ...

  • Teshumara-Guitars Of Tuareg Rebellion

    In 1963, short after the Mali state Independency, Tuareg people start a rebellion against the new authorities, which will end in a blood bath. Terrible dry seasons will follow, pushing thousands of Mali and Niger Tuareg refugees on the road to Algeria and Lybia. So is Teshumara born, in pain and exile, as a cultural and political movement stating the existence of Tuareg people, and calling for their emancipation. This is when the Tinariwen guitars started to resonnate…This film, through music, lyrics and testimonies of Tinariwen founders, but also through music and poetry, is a tribute to the memory of Teshumara, and of the Tuareg tragedy. ...

  • Testimony

    Diagnosed with brain tumour and being told that he has only has tree years to live, film director Razvan Georgescu begins to explore the territory between life and death, referring to few of its most famous “residents.” The film begins on a surgery table in Germany and then follows its author on a private journey to the venetian canals, on Broadway and Sunset Boulevard, to close the circle in native Romania. The director begins a deep search of reality, to taking him from knowing and understanding others to knowing and understanding himself. He does not record his own feelings, but the testimonials of other people who went through similar experiences (composers, painters, sculptors or writers). Captivating, touching and surprisingly filled with humour, the documentary is an extreme emotional trap, in a series of revealing meetings with artists that hope to successfully pass the test of time. ...

  • That Remarkable Visitor

    A film about modernist architecture in Bucharest between the World Wars, about the circumstances generating the spirit of renewal which characterized all Romanian culture, keeping it connected with the European cultural values. ...

  • The Absence

    Set to unravel the central yet invisible place of female domestic workers in Chilean culture, this film departs on a journey through time and space, exploring the production and reproduction of family memories through photo albums and the uses of space. Walking across the different rooms of a particular home, La Ausencia aims to unlock the stories fixed in its walls. This micro-expedition raises questions regarding the limits of memory, the sense of place, the uses of photography and the fussiness of kinship, through which it finally conveys the concealed and blurred situation in which domestic workers are immerse. ...

  • The Act Of Killing

    After the Indonesian government was overthrown by the army in 1965, Anwar and his friends became petty gangsters, leaders of the death squads. They contributed to the killing of over one million alleged Communists, Chinese ethnics and intellectuals considered enemies of the new regime. Anwar and his friends are willing to tell the story of the crimes they had done, but their idea of appearing on the big screen is not one of simple confession for a documentary: they want to be the stars of films of their favourite genres: western, musicals, gangster films. Therefore, they write the scripts, they act themselves and they even enact their victims. ...

  • The Age of Reason

    This is the fifth and final film in the Doon School Quintet, an intimate study of India's most prestigious boys' boarding school. The school is India's foremost boarding school for boys, and this film provides unique insights into the values and training of the Indian middle class and postcolonial elites more generally. In this film MacDougall focuses on the life of one student whom he discovers at the school. The film explores the thoughts and feelings of Abhishek, a 12-year-old from Nepal, during his first days and weeks as a Doon student. This is at once the story of the encounter between a filmmaker and his subject and a glimpse of the mind of a child at "the age of reason". ...

  • The age of the year, the age of man

    A film made during the 1993 "National Exhibition of Naive Art", which recreated the universe of the Romanian village throught the eyes of those who, while not professionals, express themselves with the help of paint and brushes. They experience the village as their innermost soul.. ...

  • The Amount Of Small Things

    First year in school and life ain't easy: Laethicia, Sanita, Fuat and Bright are 7 years old and confronted with the adult world of discpline and merit. "Why don't like school?" Because I cannot play with the teacher'', says Laethicia. She is one of four first-graders struggling with her new primary school reality. Potentially a safe haven for children with delicate family backgrounds, the school's demands are however tough on the youngsters who already feel caught in a rat race. Will they fit in or will they be left behind? Fuat, Sanita, Bright and Laethicia are trying hard to find the balance between school and play, between fulfilling demands and rebelling for a personality for a personality of their own. And this only the beginning of a life-long quest. A moving trip back to childhood. Whoever kiked Etre et Voir will love this film! ...

  • The Angelmakers

    Nagyrev seems to be just another forgotten place in rural Hungary. But if you take a closer look at the history of the village, you come across the ghosts of the past. In the 1920s, after a series of mysterious sudden deaths among the men in the village, an investigation of the authorities revealed they had been poisoned with arsenic. The modus operandi was quite simple, the "murder weapon" was ordinary flypaper, and the killers were their own wives. After many years of silence, the characters talk to the camera about the tormenting past events in the village life as well as about their present expectations and the actions they take to escape a boring routine. Their stories reveal how common gender confrontations can sometimes lead to extreme behaviour. ...

  • The Angelmakers

    Nagyrev seems to be just another forgotten place in rural Hungary. But if you take a closer look at the history of the village, you come across the ghosts of the past. In the 1920s, after a series of mysterious sudden deaths among the men in the village, an investigation of the authorities revealed they had been poisoned with arsenic. The modus operandi was quite simple, the "murder weapon" was ordinary flypaper, and the killers were their own wives. After many years of silence, the characters talk to the camera about the tormenting past events in the village life as well as about their present expectations and the actions they take to escape a boring routine. Their stories reveal how common gender confrontations can sometimes lead to extreme behaviour. ...

  • The Apaches

    In the south of Kosovo, in a valley close to the border with Macedonia, there is a Serb enclave of twelve villages. Two of them are somewhat protected by their central position, while the others do not enjoy the same privilege. Their exposure became more evident with the civil war and its effects on the ethnic relationships. Since 1999, the inhabitants of these villages live in almost complete isolation. All the roads connecting them with the outside world cross Kosovar territory, and are therefore dangerous and not safe for Serbs. Thus, a simple journey becomes an adventure, as they must travel in convoys, under the protection of KFOR armed forces. The film presents another type of victim of the Kosovo war, and scrutinizes the absurdities brought by ethnic conflicts into people's lives. ...

  • The Aracomorabeans

    Plan d'Aou, a suburb of Marseille, North District, swept by the wind, stowed to the hill, above the Mediterranean sea. Managers are completing the Great Urban Project. The district is going to change. Young people of the suburb, most of them Arabs or Comoreans, perform on stage their daily life, their fears and their hopes. They tell their uncertain future. ...

  • The Autobiography of Nicolae Ceausescu

    "After all, a dictator is simply an artist who is able to fully put into practice his egotism. It is a mere question of aesthetic level, whether he turns out to be Baudelaire or Bolintineanu, Louis XVI or Nicolae Ceausescu." says Andrei Ujica. During the summary trial that he and his wife were submitted to, Nicolae Ceausescu is reviewing his long reign in power: 1965-1989. It is an historical tableau that in its scope resembles American film frescos such as those dedicated to the Vietnam War. Edited using more than 1000 hours of footage from the National Archive of Films and from the National Romanian Television, the film covers 25 years of Nicolae Ceausescu's life, from 1965 when he ascended the highest position in the country until his fall in 1989. ...

  • The Baker

    For the past seven years, Lars has been working the night shift in a bakery. While following his nightly routine, we hear him speak about what he misses most. He is longing for simple things, like watching TV in the evening, sleeping when it’s dark, and feeling the sunshine on his face. An accomplished short film about a man whose occupation, while not extraordinary, prevents him from living an ordinary life. ...

  • The Banished

    A colourful documentary about the strug­gle for survival of neighbourhood youth in Helsinki over a period of one year. In at­tempt to keep the youngsters in Vesala off the streets, Timi, a 30-year old gypsy, has founded a multicultural indoor bandy team. The main characters of the film, Krisse and Ville, both play in the team. Krisse’s and Ville’s families are joined together by friendship and a common life­style. Continuous clashes with the police, alienation from society and despair lock them into a path that is sure to lead no­where. The future seems to hold no promise for Krisse and Ville. ...

  • The Beauty Exchange

    The specter of “ideal feminine beauty” rises everywhere around the three women who are the main protagonists of this exceptional film. The artificially created ideal of beauty is a phenomenon of this world, and Erika Hníková examines the issue from several angles. In addition to the three protagonists, other voices are blended into the film, among them students, beauty queens, and feminists. The author enters the debate, and through the film she not only illustrates the issue, she discovers something more about herself. ...

  • The Belovs

    A dusty country road, much vodka, or tea, Russian steam baths, cattle, dogs running about. The filmmaker takes us into the life of the Belov family. Anna Feodorovna is twice a widow, still regrets not having married her first love. Her brother, Mikhail, spends his days drinking, cursing his sister, and presenting his philosophical and political solutions to the world’s misery. There are also two more brothers, who, from time to time, come to visit Anna and Mikhail. “You shouldn’t film us.” says one of the Belovs. “We’re common people, living where the river begins.” Yet, Kossakovski did film them. He tells, in his unique style, a touching and sincere story about the life, joys and sorrows of a peasant family living in a Russian province. The Belovs is considered to be one of the masterpieces of post soviet Russian documentary cinema. It was produced by the St. Petersburg Documentary Film Studio, and Kossakowski regards himself as a disciple of the famous generation of St. Petersburg documentarists of the 1960s. This film has been shown in the most prestigeous film festivals all over the world, and it is a must see film in the curricula of most film academies in Europe. ...

  • The Belovs

    A dusty country road, much vodka, or tea, Russian steam baths, cattle, dogs running about. The filmmaker takes us into the life of the Belov family. Anna Feodorovna is twice a widow, still regrets not having married her first love. Her brother, Mikhail, spends his days drinking, cursing his sister, and presenting his philosophical and political solutions to the world’s misery. There are also two more brothers, who, from time to time, come to visit Anna and Mikhail. “You shouldn’t film us.” says one of the Belovs. “We’re common people, living where the river begins.” Yet, Kossakovski did film them. He tells, in his unique style, a touching and sincere story about the life, joys and sorrows of a peasant family living in a Russian province. The Belovs is considered to be one of the masterpieces of post soviet Russian documentary cinema. It was produced by the St. Petersburg Documentary Film Studio, and Kossakowski regards himself as a disciple of the famous generation of St. Petersburg documentarists of the 1960s. This film has been shown in the most prestigeous film festivals all over the world, and it is a must see film in the curricula of most film academies in Europe. ...

  • The Bond

    Dharavi in Mumbai (formerly Bombay) is Asia's largest slum. Squeezed between the skyscrapers of a business district and a classy suburb, one million people live in shanties crowding on a surface less than two hundred hectars wide. For many, the district is merely a reminder that, despite impressive economic growth in recent years, India remains a very poor country. But for its residents, Dharavi is more than that. It is an affordable place to live, and to work. The film explores the work of two social activists using western European methods in dealing with conflict resolutions in the neighbourhood peace committees, juxtaposing their direct experience of Dharavi with the traditional middle class perceptions of slums in general and of Dharavi in particular as a hotbed for crime and filth. The multilayered structure of the film is a challenge to a critical and active viewership. ...

  • The Brassy Bands

    Poverty is the first thing to cross your mind when thinking of a Gipsy village. And it really is the first thing to strike you when entering a Gipsy village. However, despite the poverty and the hard life, Gipsies have the sense of music and rhythm like nobody else. Music is part of their daily life, and they need music just like they need air. The film explores the fascinating hidden world of the Gypsies. ...

  • The Bridge

    A project of the museum of contemporary art, Marseilles, Le Pont evokes the sense of adventure and the link in today’s postcolonial world. Most invited artists to the exhibition experienced migration or they were interested in it. One hundred and forty-five artists coming from all over the world showed their works in the galleries and the cinema of [mac], as well as in the twenty-seven others sites in the city. For Romanian artists Ion Grigorescu and Dan Perjovschi it was a good oportunity to look into the relationship between the East and the West. ...

  • The Bridge Club

    In a small Turkish club, the clients gather round to play cards, watch football games and place bets. All are men. In this completely masculine universe, there is still a feminine presence: Nermin, an employee that works there from morning to evening. Coincidence or not, her daughter shares the habits of the clients: she is a football player. ...

  • The Brigade

    The documentary was filmed on the Yamal Peninsula in West Siberia, where the Nenets have been herding reindeer for centuries. During the Soviet times, they were organized into brigades, and much of that same system still remains today. The filmmaker followed one of the brigades, which looks after several hundred thousand reindeer. In any given year, this brigade will travel several thousand kilometers. The busiest and most arduous time is the calving season, called ty nintch. During this season, the herders must ensure that the new-born calves manage to keep up with the group. No time for sentiment, the runts of the litter are immediately killed for fear they will slow down the journey. It's a race against time as the brigade moves the immense herd across the river before the ice melts. ...

  • The Bucuresti Experiment

    The premise of the film is that in 1989, in Romania, a coup took place instead of a revolution. Being in the know, the Securitate is preparing the “new man” - this time, a capitalist – conducting a psychological-scientific experiment. The film follows the story of the first man who took part in the Bucharest experiment, Andrei Juvina, and the way in which this destroyed his relationship with Carmen Anton, a former musical star of the 80s. However, towards the end of the documentary we discover that the Bucharest experiment did not take place, but the Pitești experiment will remain one of the great horrors in human history. ...

  • The Call of the Mountain

    The story of a man who abandons his wife and eight-year-old son in Athens following the murder of his cousin in the White Mountains of Crete. Returning to the small, remote community where he grew up, Yiannis confronts his past and pledges to honour his cousin by tending the family herd. He struggles to carry on Ilias' calling, a dying tradition kept alive by a handful of isolated men, high on the barren mountainsides of Crete overlooking the Libyan Sea. ...

  • The Candle

    The candle-making process at a monastery in Serbia. All the communities from the neighbourhood participate in the process. Each family collects bee wax and donates it to the monastery for candle making. ...

  • The Carbon Crooks

    The signer countries of the Kyoto Protocol engaged in carbon emission and greenhouse gases reduction, but left a loophole: if the a certain country exceeds the carbon limit, it can buy carbon credits in third world countries, where they can develop ecological projects. However, many of these projects failed to meet the promissed standards. Moreover, Europol estimates a 10 billion fraud of European funds on the carbon market. Carbon emissions have never been higher and it has never been cheaper to pollute. ...

  • The Center

    Europe's geographic center must be lacated somewhere between North Cape, Greece, Portugal and Russia. Stanislav Mucha untekes the task of finding the centre of Europe. His rechearch has been more than successful, since he found no less than 20 geographical centres of the continent. Depending to the interviewers the "real" centre lie in Germany, in Austria, in Lithuania, in Poland in Slovakia or in Ukraine. Travelling across the continent, the filmmaker collected hallucinating, extravagant, utopian, chauvinist, fantastic, or well-documented testimonies on the subject. As Europe undergoes a process of expansion, we can assume that its center, wherever it might be, has a vocation to move. Geography is less important when you can state , at least one in a lifetime, thet you are living in the center of the world. ...

  • THE CHESS PLAYERS

    The German women's national chess team goes to the Chess Olympiad. The goal: Top Ten. The team consists of very different individuals: while Elisabeth, former chess prodigy and Germany's only female pro, has played for the national team many times, Melanie and Sarah take part in such an important tournament for the first time. Due to the high pressure, tensions arise in the group, and eventually the situation goes from bad to worse. A documentary about winning and losing in a sport in which players fight with the sharpest weapon: the mind. ...

  • The Child Sex Trade

    Multi-award winning filmmaker Liviu Tipurita investigates paedophile rings and the pan-European trafficking of children. ...

  • The Children Of Uranium

    After working in the mines for decades, the survivors are there even in their dreams: in the uranium mine. However, in reality, in B?i?a Plai nothing resembles what once was. The "Avram Iancu" mine was closed in 1998 due to environmental concerns. The settlement is ailing. From the labourers of those times, few are alive. The once nice blocks are but a ruin. The people live by collecting mushrooms and selling them abroad. Because "who gives you a job, all sick and irradiated? We kick the bucket one after the other." A black irony - even though the mine is closed, the traces of uranium can be found everywhere. The radiation level is high, the houses are double afflicted: from both the mine and the construction materials taken from the area. There is ore everywhere: locals can find pieces in the road dust, the children play in soil with a radiation level much above the allowed threshold. Above all, an innocent boy's whistling is heard. ...

  • The Column of Trajan, The Feeling of the Hour Glass

    The Column of Trajan is a stone document about the Romanian people's genesis. Its graphic stone replica, a book on the column's restaurationin the 16-th century forms the basis of this film. ...

  • The Corlat Valley

    There are several ethnic communities that live in Romania. In Brasov county, 87% of the inhabitants are ethnic Romanians. In Covasna county, 76% of the inhabitants are ethnic Hungarians. This is the story of a valley between Brasov and Covasna. A village there is being refused its right to identity; it has no name and it doesn’t exist on any map. Because most of the inhabitants in the valley are Roma, people call the place “Tziganie”. The Roma call this place “over the bridge”, and the authorities speak about the “village in the Corlat valley”. ...

  • The Country Where The Soil Lived

    Shot in a village, in the Maramures region, in northwestern Romania, the film explores the mutations that have recently occurred in rural life. Until not very long ago, the villagers have kept the slow pace of past centuries. They have worked the land without mechanized help, manually pulled water from wells, and, ordered their life according to centuries-old secular and religious rituals. Today, their minds are oriented towards modernization, change, and the European Union. The film intimately observes the impact of change on the life of one family in the village. Undoubtedly, the old world will eventually disappear, to be replaced by a more comfortable modern life. What the latter will bring about, and what price the people will have to pay for the advantages of modernization, is difficult to predict. ...

  • The courtyard

    Dark corridors and shabby appartments make up the setting of the film. Hard to believe as it may be, the location is heart of Bucharest. The rooms offer too little privacy so that people can tell you everything about their neighbours. Their sordid life is coloured by cheap conflicts and some real dramatic events. The apartements look into a dirty courtyard surrounded by high buildings. But those who look high enough can see a patch of blue. ...

  • The Cross

    Everyone bears their cross. It seems as though the cross of Natasha, a mother of three, was predestined by her place of residence. She took a different path. While truly rusting in God she believes in herself. Natasha lives on the island of Valaam with her three children of the first marriage and her husband. Anatoly returned after serving time again a few years ago. They didn't know each other before even though Anatoly comes from this island. They met as pen pals. He asked her to believe him and she did. Anatoly drinks. He sometimes keeps on drinking for days or even weeks. Then he doesn't work although at the monastery he is appreciated as a good worker and leader. He tortures Natasha with suspicions, interrogations and demands. She takes all his claims humbly and meekly. But then there is a guest in their home. She finds Anatoly holding a knife and it turns out he slapped Natasha's daughter in the face. They plead Anatoly to leave the house for awhile. Natasha goes to church. She prays for him, for her children and for herself. She keeps on believing that he will change and she won't have to leave him. And that whatever happens, life with Anatoly is her cross that she is going to carry with all humility. For the sake of him, and the children, and God… ...

  • The crucified church

    The village Sviniţa had to be evacuated and flooded when a dam was built on the Danube. But even before that, the communists destroyed the village church. People have buile themselves new houses, but they have not abandoned the old church. All religious celebrations take place on the lake shore, where they can see the ruined walls rise from the water. ...

  • The Curse

    More than thirty years ago, in a village in north Romania’s Maramures region, a young family was having their first child. Everyone was happy, as the infant was a healthy boy. Soon, the baby developed a mysterious disease, which deformed and paralyzed his limbs. He was also showing signs of mental disorder. The doctors diagnosed muscular dystrophy, paralysis, and mental retardation. The second child came, and shortly afterward, the same symptoms appeared. The couple did not give up hope to have a healthy child. However, their third son suffered the same unfortunate fate as his brothers. The film goes beyond the shocking image of three disabled brothers. It analyzes the traditional beliefs, on which the villagers base their comments, regarding the tragic destiny of this family. ...

  • The Curse Of The Hedgehog

    The film follows the life of an extended Roma family for a whrole year. They belong to the "Baiesi "group of Roma, who live in extreme poverty. The filmmaker accompanied them on the way from their dwelling place in the mountain to the lowland villages, where they try to trade handmade goods for food or money. These winter tours are survival trips for them, as they have no other income whatsoever. However, the film is more than the story of their struggle to survive. During the 100 minutes, we come to understand why they refuse to work the land, and how they relate to the Romania shepherds, and to the rich Baesi from their village they call "businessmen", who make large fortunes from selling fake rings abroad. We discover how mythological thinking is activated in their everyday life, along with their Christian Orthodox religiousness. By watching this film, we achieve a better understanding of the absurdities and the pain that fill the lives of these people living on the edge of society, and we come to admire the wit, and the humour, which help them to come through. ...

  • The Curse Of The Hedgehog

    The film follows the life of an extended Roma family for a whrole year. They belong to the "Baiesi "group of Roma, who live in extreme poverty. The filmmaker accompanied them on the way from their dwelling place in the mountain to the lowland villages, where they try to trade handmade goods for food or money. These winter tours are survival trips for them, as they have no other income whatsoever. However, the film is more than the story of their struggle to survive. During the 100 minutes, we come to understand why they refuse to work the land, and how they relate to the Romania shepherds, and to the rich Baesi from their village they call "businessmen", who make large fortunes from selling fake rings abroad. We discover how mythological thinking is activated in their everyday life, along with their Christian Orthodox religiousness. By watching this film, we achieve a better understanding of the absurdities and the pain that fill the lives of these people living on the edge of society, and we come to admire the wit, and the humour, which help them to come through. ...

  • The Curse Of The Hedgehog

    The film follows the life of an extended Roma family for a whrole year. They belong to the "Baiesi "group of Roma, who live in extreme poverty. The filmmaker accompanied them on the way from their dwelling place in the mountain to the lowland villages, where they try to trade handmade goods for food or money. These winter tours are survival trips for them, as they have no other income whatsoever. However, the film is more than the story of their struggle to survive. During the 100 minutes, we come to understand why they refuse to work the land, and how they relate to the Romania shepherds, and to the rich Baesi from their village they call "businessmen", who make large fortunes from selling fake rings abroad. We discover how mythological thinking is activated in their everyday life, along with their Christian Orthodox religiousness. By watching this film, we achieve a better understanding of the absurdities and the pain that fill the lives of these people living on the edge of society, and we come to admire the wit, and the humour, which help them to come through. ...

  • THE CUT

    A circumcised girl is like a stone... The Kuria people in Kenya and Tanzania are still practicing Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as a ritual. It is painful and even dangerous. The older generation and peer pressure uphold the legacy of the ancestors... but the effect of generational practice has created a mixed feeling among the youth of the 21st century. So what can human right activists do? ...

  • The Day I Will Never Forget

    The film explores the practice of female circumcision within different Kenyan and Somali communities. The practice is part of female initiation ceremonies and varies from relatively minor surgery to the complete removal of the clitoris, and the sewing up of the vagina. To Western culture this is mutilation. For the locals, it is an ancient tradition that should by no means be abandoned. The world, however, is changing and new generations begin to question tradition and rebel against circumcision. Meanwhile, the older women in the community praise circumcision as a way to purity and health. A female doctor attempts to achieve a compromise and open people's minds to accepting safer and less painful medical procedures. The film follows the stories of young girls who are caught between loyalty to their parents, the desire to rebel against old customs, and the fear that in doing so they will be rejected by their community. An extreme situation is that of a young girl who takes her own parents to court to stop them from having her circumcised. This event has historic implications for the entire cultural group. The confrontation between tradition and change is not yet over. ...

  • The Day I Will Never Forget

    The film explores the practice of female circumcision within different Kenyan and Somali communities. The practice is part of female initiation ceremonies and varies from relatively minor surgery to the complete removal of the clitoris, and the sewing up of the vagina. To Western culture this is mutilation. For the locals, it is an ancient tradition that should by no means be abandoned. The world, however, is changing and new generations begin to question tradition and rebel against circumcision. Meanwhile, the older women in the community praise circumcision as a way to purity and health. A female doctor attempts to achieve a compromise and open people's minds to accepting safer and less painful medical procedures. The film follows the stories of young girls who are caught between loyalty to their parents, the desire to rebel against old customs, and the fear that in doing so they will be rejected by their community. An extreme situation is that of a young girl who takes her own parents to court to stop them from having her circumcised. This event has historic implications for the entire cultural group. The confrontation between tradition and change is not yet over. ...

  • The Death of Yugoslavia; Part I: Enter Nationalism

    Never before, during the course of a war, have all the heads of the rival states told the inside story of the decisive moments in the conflict. ...

  • The Eye Of The Day

    Against the backdrop of growing protests in opposition to party of Indonesian dictator Suharto and the elections that will bring Megawati to power, The Eye of the Day follows the daily lives of Rumidjah, her family and their friends. Rumidjah, a sixty-two year-old widow, lives with her children and grandchildren in a working-class section of Jakarta. The Eye of the Day encompasses the life in Rumidjah's living room as well as the political confrontations in the streets of Jakarta and the nighttime labor of scavengers at a massive garbage dump. Helmrich's patient camera reveals the drama, and striking images, in each of these locations. ...

  • The Fairy Island

    Celebrates a lost way of life of generations of artisans in Hungary who for centuries have lived around the banks of the river Danube and made their livelihood from it, including gold washers, thatchers, basket weavers and feather strippers. The river is being diverted into the massive Gabcivko hydro-electric dam in neighboring Slovakia. ...

  • The Fallen Vampire – Bela Lugosi

    The film follows the biography of the actor Bela Lugosi from his birth and early childhood in a small Transylvanian town, his early days as an actor when he played Jesus on the stage of the National Theatre in Budapest, and the years of glory after playing Dracula, the "mysterious count of the Carpathians". He ended up being identified with his character, and never really escaped the Dracula label. Bela Lugosi is introduced in the film by people who knew him: close friends, family, oponents, directors and script writers he worked with (among them Bela Lugosi Jr., director István Szabó, actor Boris Karloff, historian Gary Rhodes). The documentary also investigates the influence of Bela Lugosi's Transylvanian origin in the process of creating the character that made him famous. ...

  • The Fat to Bed, the Slim to the Ball

    A fat woman's life in a highly intolerant society is not a bed of roses. Indeed, a young fat woman will more likely end up in bed with a man rather than at a fancy restaurant. Yet, overweight women strive to find happiness, constantly struggling with obstacles they encounter almost every day. The film was inspired by a website, www.XL-pozytywnie.pl, aimed at raising public awareness on the issue of the increasing number of overweight persons in Poland. The site offers advise on various subjects such as fashion, sports, mental health, and sex. The author of the website, Marta, has fought her own personal battle. The film offers an intimate insight of the difficulties she experienced as a teenager, and of her fight to acquire self-confidence ...

  • The Fat to Bed, the Slim to the Ball

    A fat woman's life in a highly intolerant society is not a bed of roses. Indeed, a young fat woman will more likely end up in bed with a man rather than at a fancy restaurant. Yet, overweight women strive to find happiness, constantly struggling with obstacles they encounter almost every day. The film was inspired by a website, www.XL-pozytywnie.pl, aimed at raising public awareness on the issue of the increasing number of overweight persons in Poland. The site offers advise on various subjects such as fashion, sports, mental health, and sex. The author of the website, Marta, has fought her own personal battle. The film offers an intimate insight of the difficulties she experienced as a teenager, and of her fight to acquire self-confidence ...

  • The Fireman

    Charlie is a fireman who always does everything wrong. A man talks the Fire Chief into ignoring his burning home (he wants the insurance money) unaware that his daughter (the love of the Chief) is upstairs in the house. When the house next door catches fire its owner rouses Charlie who rouses the force. ...

  • The Fires of the Dead

    The Thursday before Easter, at night, the women of the village made a fire in their yards out of hazel tree branches and afterwards they wept for their dead in the graveyard. ...

  • The First Inhabitors of the Strouma River Basin /VII-V millenium BC/

    By means of archaeological finds from the last decade, discovered around the riverside of Strouma and kept in the funds of the Museum of History, Kyustendil, are performed the character and the changes of the prehistorical cultures there -during 7th -5th millennium BC (the time of the Neolithic and E neolithic). The first inhibitors of the Strouma basin were farmers and stock-breeders For their material culture and spiritual life we can draw conclusions from the tools, pottery, "prewriting" signs, the cult objects, the anthropomorphic and zoomorphic figurines. The film is one possible view towards the "ruins" of the bright Neolithic and E neolithic cultures of the Strouma basin, which mark the supreme achievements in the prehistorical societies of the Balkans and Europe. ...

  • The Flower Bridge

    Costica Arhir raises his tree children in the village of Acui, Republic of Moldavia. His wife has left for Italy three and half years ago to find work, and has not been home since. In a similar situation are around half of thr active population of this country. The documentary film, shot between january and april 2007, uses fictional elements in storytelling and camerawork, creating a stage where the characters interpret themselves. ...

  • The Future of Visual Anthropology

    In the summer of 2001 the IWF in Gottingen hosted the conference "Origins of Visual Anthropology - Putting the Past Together". Important representatives of the field came together to discuss the history of the subdiscipline. Three students were equally interested in their visions about "The Future of Visual Anthropology". They conducted brief interviews concerning this question with filmmakers and scholars such as Jean Rouch, lan Dunlop, Paul Henley, Karl Heider, Howard Morphy, Peter Crawford, Harald Prins, and Jay Ruby. "The Future of Visual Anthropology" presents the common themes that were touched upon during these conversations. The film is a reflection on how people talk and think about the future, present and past of Visual Anthropology in 2001. The film will be published on DVD together with all the unedited interviews. This makes it useful for teaching and documentation but also constitutes a piece of Visual Anthropology that discloses its strategies of representation. ...

  • The Ghost On TV

    In February 2004, a ritual exhumation in the village of Celaru, in south Romania, was news on every Romanian TV channel. Reporters invaded the village and interviewed the local people. This attention served to re-open the controversy between pagan rituals and Christian norms. According to ancient beliefs, the “evil dead” become ghosts and remain, in this world, to haunt the living. The only remedy is to open the grave and perform certain rituals. This usually involves stabbing the heart of the deceased. The film investigates various opinions, of the local people, concerning this ancient custom. Further, it analyzes their reactions to the presence of the TV crews. ...

  • The Great Communist Bank Robery

    In 1959 there was robbery at the Romanian National Bank in Bucharest. The robbers were six formerly high-ranked members of the communist party. They were arrested and then forced to play themselves in a propaganda film meant to reconstruct the crime and the investigations that followed it. At the end of the trial (also filmed), the defendants were sentenced to death and executed. Three weeks later, the film "Reconstruction" was released. The author of this documentary carefully researched this incredible story and found terrible testimonies related to the events that happened more than forty years ago. ...

  • The Great Communist Bank Robery

    In 1959 there was robbery at the Romanian National Bank in Bucharest. The robbers were six formerly high-ranked members of the communist party. They were arrested and then forced to play themselves in a propaganda film meant to reconstruct the crime and the investigations that followed it. At the end of the trial (also filmed), the defendants were sentenced to death and executed. Three weeks later, the film "Reconstruction" was released. The author of this documentary carefully researched this incredible story and found terrible testimonies related to the events that happened more than forty years ago. ...

  • THE GYPSY BALL

    At the bottom of Fagaras Mountains, the first sociological film in the world was made, supervised by the founder of the sociological school in Bucharest, Dimitrie Gusti, in 1929. This would be the first sociologic documentary in the history of the cinema where a community of gypsies is presented. Eight decades after, sociologists came back to Dragus in order to account a history of coexistence. Through the film, they talk about the dramatic changes, about the stunning transitions, about a fascinating and forbidden world, the world of the Other. The film is an adventure story of a ball that has crossed time and history, is the adventure of meeting of worlds that attract and repel, is about a way to be normal in a world that was not always so. It is the story of the Gypsy Ball. ...

  • The Internet Bride

    Looking for love on the Internet is becoming more and more popular. Services such as the "Internet" or "mail-order" bride attract an increasing number of clients. But who are the men who use such services to find a life-time partner? And who are the potential brides whose photos pop up on cyber-galleries? Apparently, men who seek brides on the Internet are all white, middle-aged, and coming from Western Europe or from the United States. The women generally seek a better future in the US of in a Western European country. The film goes beyond stereotypes, introducing some of the clients of the "Latin Best" agency, and the Colombian women who have been included in the agency's data base. ...

  • The Internet is Closing Down

    Why does copyright exist? Who is actually affected by web piracy? Why do we sometimes feel like criminals when we are online? This short film looks into the issue of copyright in the context of today's digital life. Culture has become collaborative and creativity defines a new generation. We have something important which needs to be protected: the digital world, the place where innovation and knowledge (still) travel freely. ...

  • THE JAPANESE QUINCE TREE

    The Japanese Quince Tree is a haiku-like documentary about loneliness, cats with nine lives, death and quinces. ...

  • The Key

    In a village in the Galilean Mountains, there are two Israeli inhabitants and they are at war. The object of their never-ending dispute is the key to the ancient synagogue. Each of them claims to have the right to keep it, invoking complicated and intricate family ties. Projected on the background of the endless Middle East conflict, their quarrel is a tragicomedy of human nature. What causes people to fight each other? Why is reconciliation practically impossible? Nevertheless, the two enemies find common ground when an outsider starts to build a new synagogue nearby. "When somebody attacks from the outside," one of the characters explains, "all Jews would unite in spite of their domestic disagreements. But when the conflict is over, they eat each other alive and the Arabs just sit aside and laugh their heads off." Following this small scale conflict, with its amusing, ridiculous, and sometimes moving moments, the viewer may ponder the broader question: Is there a key to the Middle East situation? ...

  • The Lamenters

    When the professional lamenters perform the archaic ritual of death, they become spiritually connected to those who pass to the Other World, establishing a link between life and death. In their everyday life they are common housewives, concerned with the daily household care. The film talks about the professional lamenters in the Romanian village Sapânta, in Maramures. They reveal their thoughts about life and death, and about the mysteries of Other World, hidden to most people, but open to intuitive perception of some. A film about the profession and the vocation of lamenting the dead. ...

  • The Land is Waiting

    The film explores the life of an extremely poor family, living in a village in northeast Romania. The parents have made incredible efforts to send all ten of their children to school. Five of them have even made it to the university in the city. The film focuses on Mihai, one of their sons. After less than one year of study, Mihai had to give up Theological School. He chose to return to the village and help his family work the tiny plot of land they own. We follow him as he copes with the hardships of everyday rural life. Because he plans to return to the university next year, he uses every spare moment to study for his exams. He talks about his short experience in the city, and about the marginalization of the students of rural origin. Daily routine is interrupted by the occasional conflicts with his overworked mother. However, there are also the little joys of the household, such as when a calf is born or the goslings hatch. The filmmaker maintains an objective yet intimate approach, of the destiny of a young man who is caught between two worlds. ...

  • The Land is Waiting

    The film explores the life of an extremely poor family, living in a village in northeast Romania. The parents have made incredible efforts to send all ten of their children to school. Five of them have even made it to the university in the city. The film focuses on Mihai, one of their sons. After less than one year of study, Mihai had to give up Theological School. He chose to return to the village and help his family work the tiny plot of land they own. We follow him as he copes with the hardships of everyday rural life. Because he plans to return to the university next year, he uses every spare moment to study for his exams. He talks about his short experience in the city, and about the marginalization of the students of rural origin. Daily routine is interrupted by the occasional conflicts with his overworked mother. However, there are also the little joys of the household, such as when a calf is born or the goslings hatch. The filmmaker maintains an objective yet intimate approach, of the destiny of a young man who is caught between two worlds. ...

  • The Land o Silence

    What can a photo camera mean for a 10-year old boy who lives in a soundless world? The film follows the summer holiday adventures of Alfred who can neither hear nor speak. Because of his handicap he attends a special school in Cluj. Back home for his holiday, he meets a photographer from a neighbouring village. The man who has the same handicap as Alfred, offers the boy a photo camera. And Alfred's adventure begins. ...

  • The Lapirovs Go West

    In 1981, a Russian Jew family finally receive their immigration visas for the USA. Ilya Lapirov is in his fifties. He teaches Russian literature. Together with his wife Isabella, and their 9-years old son Kiecha, they leave the URSS for the first time. Jean Luc Leon accompanies them to Los Angeles, their new home, and the camera recors their reactions of amusement and the delusion while they addapt to their new lives. Only in 1993 the Lapirovs manage to save enough money for a 10 days trip to Moscow. The film captures emotional scenes with the Lapirovs visiting places and old friends after 10 years of absence. After all they have been through, "home" has a diffrent meaning for each of them. ...

  • The Last Mission

    Tiberius Petre is the first Romanian soldier to die in a direct crossfire, since 1945. The film shows his last mission to Afghanistan. Commander of a mixed Romanian-American commando with the mission to liquidate the Taliban leaders, Tiberius Petre was filmed only two months before his death. He was shot to death two weeks before he was supposed to return home. The documentary made by the well- known television journalist Adelin Petrisor, include the interview of the soldier killed in his mission and the statements of his colleagues, witnesses of his last moment, as well as word of his wife. The filmmaker spent two weeks next to the soldiers, joined them into mission and slept in their camp. ...

  • The Last Peasants - Journeys

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northen Romania is a world of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. but the young villagers see no roamnce in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. in Budesti, every family has an illegal immmigrant abroad. In Journeys, he explores the realities facing the immigrants. observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. at the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Peasants: Part 3 - A Good Wife

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northern Romania is a world of of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. But the young villagers see no romance in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. In Budesti, every family has an illegal immigrant abroad. After exploring in Journeys the realities facing the immigrants, Temptation observes the clash of cultures, and the expectations of different generations in rural Romania. Finally, A Good Wife focuses on the impact of migration on the local community. Observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. At the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Peasants: Part 3 - A Good Wife

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northern Romania is a world of of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. But the young villagers see no romance in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. In Budesti, every family has an illegal immigrant abroad. After exploring in Journeys the realities facing the immigrants, Temptation observes the clash of cultures, and the expectations of different generations in rural Romania. Finally, A Good Wife focuses on the impact of migration on the local community. Observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. At the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Peasants: Part 3 - A Good Wife

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northern Romania is a world of of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. But the young villagers see no romance in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. In Budesti, every family has an illegal immigrant abroad. After exploring in Journeys the realities facing the immigrants, Temptation observes the clash of cultures, and the expectations of different generations in rural Romania. Finally, A Good Wife focuses on the impact of migration on the local community. Observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. At the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Peasants:Part 1 - Journeys

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northern Romania is a world of of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. But the young villagers see no romance in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. In Budesti, every family has an illegal immigrant abroad. After exploring in Journeys the realities facing the immigrants, Temptation observes the clash of cultures, and the expectations of different generations in rural Romania. Finally, A Good Wife focuses on the impact of migration on the local community. Observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. At the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Peasants:Part 2 - Temptation

    Angus Macqueen's three-part series follows the human stories of three Romanian families torn apart by the realities of migration. The remote village of Budesti in Northern Romania is a world of of the past, filled with horses and carts, and medieval beliefs. But the young villagers see no romance in their existence. Their eyes are turned to the modern world of the West. In Budesti, every family has an illegal immigrant abroad. After exploring in Journeys the realities facing the immigrants, Temptation observes the clash of cultures, and the expectations of different generations in rural Romania. Finally, A Good Wife focuses on the impact of migration on the local community. Observational, up-close, and touching, the film looks at the changes imposed on the local community by the collapse of Communism and the new relationship with Western Europe. At the same time, The Last Peasants depicts the agony of the peasant culture that has survived two World Wars and half a century of communism, but is threatened with extinction after just a decade of democracy. ...

  • The Last Rites Of The Honorable Mr. Rai

    The Last Rites of the Honourable Mr. Rai is a film about the cremation of a longtime resident of the holy city of Varanasi. This film, made at the request of the Rai family, is possibly the most detailed and respectful study of the Hindu rites of cremation on the sacred banks of the river Ganga at the historic Harish Chandra Ghat. With no invasive narration but with inter-titles and subtitles the film enables the viewer to see, hear and experience all that is said by the mourners, the funerary priest and cremation ground specialists, as they carry out this final rite of passage for a Hindu. To underscore that death is as much a part of everyday life, the film begins and ends with the experience of everyday life on the famous ghats of Varanasi and shows the interaction of people with their gods, animals and the sacred river itself. ...

  • THE LAST STREET

    In Barcelona, the remains of the old city enters the Mediterranean like a wedge between the urban beach and the new harbour, resisting in its own way the attacks of real estate development. The sailor-spirited streets of La Barceloneta lie beneath the shadow cast by apartments where you can still see clothes hanging in the balconies and recognize new neighbours because they "don't know how to hang it properly". The defending neighbours of La Barceloneta tell their life stories and prepare the annual festivity in their street, which depends less of the City's bureaucracy than of the good will of those who live there. These retired women can still make you smile, plus they know every nook of the neighbourhood. This film makes the difficult seem easy: capturing the essence of something that is vanishing, between the memories of sailor legends and the premonition of an advancing modernity. ...

  • The Last Violin

    Ivan, a Ruthenian mountain farmer, is a man of many talents. He plays several musical instruments, but the love of his life are his violins. He is also skilled in building jew's harps virtually out of nothing. On top of this, he is a witty and charismatic character. The Third Violin is the final part of a Ruthenian trilogy. It is an intimate portrait of a village in Maramures, where the filmmaker has spent many years, during which he acquired a deep knowledge of the place, and the friendship and respect of the people. ...

  • The Last Yugoslavian Footbal Team

    The Film follows some of the football players of Yugoslavia's dream team of the 80s, exploring how political and ethnic conflicts can turn the sports arena into a battlefield for political and ethnic disputes. Once idolized as national heroes, they were cheered by fans all over the country. Since the 90s, the separation of the ex-Yugoslavian republics has divided them into different national teams. Now, the former team-mates and friends are pitted against each other, and the same crowd that a few years ago used to revere them, now boo the Croatians playing in Belgrade and jeer the Serbs playing in Zagreb. The camaraderie that once united them during their glory days has not survived. In spite of their desire to continue their old friendships, they cannot resist the competitive pressure put on them by a sport that celebrates individual, physical dominance over the spirit of the game. ...

  • The Last Yugoslavian Footbal Team

    The Film follows some of the football players of Yugoslavia's dream team of the 80s, exploring how political and ethnic conflicts can turn the sports arena into a battlefield for political and ethnic disputes. Once idolized as national heroes, they were cheered by fans all over the country. Since the 90s, the separation of the ex-Yugoslavian republics has divided them into different national teams. Now, the former team-mates and friends are pitted against each other, and the same crowd that a few years ago used to revere them, now boo the Croatians playing in Belgrade and jeer the Serbs playing in Zagreb. The camaraderie that once united them during their glory days has not survived. In spite of their desire to continue their old friendships, they cannot resist the competitive pressure put on them by a sport that celebrates individual, physical dominance over the spirit of the game. ...

  • The Little Girls of Palmi

    In a small town alongside the Southern coast of Italy, some little girls compete to play the role of "Animella" - an annual religious procession. The winner shall be seated on a 30-meter-high machinery to portray the Holy Mary ascending to Heaven. The camera covers the events backstage, follows the young competitors and their parents, and describes the social context and the involvement of the local community in the revival of an old tradition of the Catholic Church. The young girls act like little stars of a bieauty contest, and the result is a mixture of kitsch, innocence and grandeur. ...

  • The Living Water

    Through the story of Hortense, l'Eau vive go deep into the question of the relation of man with the nature. The transhumance is the symbol of a symbiotic and historical relation between humans and animal nature disturbed by the technological "modernity" represented by the edification of the mountain hydrolic barrage and the consequent diorder of the global ecology of traditional life of one side, and the confusion provoked in human life, on the other side. L'eau vive, where shepard and sheep are the other main heroes of the story remain an ode to nature and the questions approached are still of a very great acuality. ...

  • The Loan, the Chicken and the Egg

    Buusaa, a small Ethiopian business created by political activists upon their release from prison, offers loans to poor people. The intensive campaign for attracting clients finally shows results. One of the agents manages to convince the women in his village to make small loans that would help them earn enough money to improve their living situations and pay back the loan. Their high hopes are dashed when reality deviates from the path forecasted by the agent. One woman purchases a chicken of an American breed. All is well at first as the chicken lays eggs, the eggs hatch into chicks, and the chicks grow into full-grown, egg producing chickens. But when a rat starts eating the eggs, happy times turn sour. The woman decides to poison the rat, but the rat poison is eaten instead by the American chicken, which dies. Nevertheless, the loan must be repaid. Doubt arises among the borrowers as they face more and more hardships, and the Buusaa agents must use all their talents for persuasion to keep their clientele. Heated discussions reveal the problems of day-to-day survival and make them rethink their ideologies. ...

  • The Long Tears - An Ndebele Story

    The film documents over a period of five years Ndebele art, culture and traditions, as seen through the eyes of one family. It also tells the untold story of the Ndebele defeat in war against the Boer farmers over a hundred years ago, their subsequent enslavery and mistreatment at the hands of Boer farmers, and explores the decline of Ndebele wall art and dress traditions in the changing tapestry of the New South Africa. This is a unique look at the Ndebele culture, seen from a modern perspective and through an intimate relationship with one family. It is a South African story, told in their own words by the people themselves. ...

  • The Lost Village

    In an inhospitable place, on a marshland surrounded by woods, there is a hermitage surrounded by a centuries-old village. The village community performes every day ceremonies devoted to the Virgin. Their whole lives are built around protecting and venerating Holy Mary, whose image is kept in the hermitage. The film analyses the magnetism exerted by the cult of the Virgin on this small rural community and on the entire Catholic world. ...

  • The Man With a Thousand Eyes

    Called the dean of photojournalists, Josif Berman, who lived in Romania between 1890 and 1941, was attracted to the avant-garde movement and made a great contribution to the development of ethnographic photography. As a photographer, Berman documented extraordinary social events, witnessed crucial historical moments, and knew just about all the big names of his time who had an influence over the destiny of Romania. This film is about a man whose life was meaningful only as long as he could photograph, and about his photos which bear witness to an era. ...

  • THE MARBLE VILLAGE

    Fifty years ago the Romanian village Alun used to be a very animated, flourishing place. Its existence was closely linked to the marble quarry in its vicinity where people used to extract marble for various uses, including for paving the road and building their houses. Today everything looks deserted, and yet the beauty of the place is haunting. The Marble Village is a portrait of a village seen through the eyes of four characters. Maria, her son Gheorghe, Ovidiu, a shepherd and Elisabeta, a widow, tell us the story of the place, in their own words. They are the last inhabitants of Alun, who did not leave their traditional way of life. After people abandon the countryside and move to the big cities what remains behind?... This short film is an attempt to capture the memories of a vanishing village. ...

  • The Massacre

    „The Massacre” presents the tragedy of the Black Sea dolphins killed each year by fishing nets, pollution or ships. The number of the marine cetaceans decreased from millions some 60-70 years ago, to several thousands in current years. The documentary highlights the efforts of several people to stop the massacre of the marine mammals. The protagonists are Razvan Popescu Mirceni - Director of the NGO „Oceanic Club”, Angelica Curlisca - Director of the „Delphinarium” Constanta and Nicolae Papadopol - Scientific Director of the Museum Complex of Natural Sciences in Constanta. Papadopol recalls in a dramatic interview, the dolphin slaughter in the '50's-'60's, when the marine mammals were hunted most often without purpose. Another important moment of the film presents the Coast Guard tracking and catching a Turkish fishing vessel, one of which in 2002 had massacred thousands of dolphins in the Black Sea. ...

  • The Medieval past in Sibiu

    In the Transilvanian town of Sibiu gothic arhitectural jewels of the middle ages have been preserved to delight the eyes of visitors. ...

  • The Miracle Man

    The film is an intimate portrait of an extraordinary character. Many years ago, Ioan Mates chose to live in solitude. Without any special training or education, he was able to manufacture all sorts of firearms. For this reason people called him “the miracle man”. His weapons had been the passion of his life, and he was devastated when the authorities confiscated them. Now he is completely alone, living in a world of his own, reading old books and talking in rhymes. The miracle man lives at the twilight between reality and illusion. ...

  • The Miraculous Water

    For centuries before the October Revolution the pilgrimage of Korennaja Pustin in Kursk, 5,000 km south of Moscow, was amongst the biggest events of the Orthodox church of Russia. The film was shot in 1993 shortly after the monastery was given back to the church. The chaos and anarchy said to be engulfing Russia cannot be found here where the local community seems in perfect order. The "white brothers" are trying to recruit new members for their sect in the streets. The television plays american movies of Marylin Monroe, and more than 5,000 people follow the holy icon, which is, unfortunately a replica. The original is in New York! To each his own miraculous water! ...

  • The New Boys

    The social dynamics of the group is the focus of this film on life in a school dormitory, the latest in MacDougall’s long-term study of childhood and adolescence at the Doon School in northern India. The school is India’s foremost boarding school for boys, and this film provides unique insights into the values and training of the Indian middle class and postcolonial elites more generally. Within the group are boys of varied personalities and backgrounds—some natural leaders, some subject to teasing and bullying, some argumentative, some peace-makers. An important feature of the film is the inclusion of conversations among the boys about the causes of aggression and warfare, homesickness, restaurant food, and how to speak to a ghost. This film is part of the Doon school series, an extensive video project started in 1997, which has resulted in five films focusing on various aspects of childhood and adolescence, masculinity, the social aesthetics of institutions, postcoloniality, and the training of South Asian elites. ...

  • The New Saint

    'Yevgeny Rodionov was an ordinary young Russian soldier until he was taken prisoner in Chechnya, and killed because he refused to convert to Islam. Hence he was proclaimed a martyr and became an unofficial saint for many Russians. The life of Yevgeny's mother Lyubov underwent a radical change since people had sanctified her son. Unable to let go of her grief, she keeps his iconic memory alive with the support of Orthodox priests, biker gangs and the Russian army, which uses his legend as an example for young soldiers. While the saint's mother appears on TV shows, young cadets are preparing to sacrifice themselves and follow their hero's footsteps. ...

  • THE OLD TIME VILLAGE

    Why did maidens braid yellow bedstraw wreaths on Midsummer Day? What does “trampling a clay oven” mean? How intricate can a loom be? An atypical film about the life in the old time village and about a fabulous museum worth a detour. ...

  • The Opinionator

    The film touches in a very subtile way the issue of Russian citizens living in former Soviet Union countries outside the present Russian Federation borders. To 68 year-old Esja Sur, a Russian citizen residing in Estonia, retirement is anything but boring. She is a natural born agitator who finds plenty of issues to fight for. On the background of today's Estonian reality, the filmmaker chronicles the efforts of this woman. Putting together different groups and associations, she is also seen organizing protests, meetings and demonstrations. The fact that most of her events are mere mockeries of the grandiose Soviet parades of the past, with barely more than a dozen people attending, does not seem to discourage her. The filmmaker achieves a slightly ironic, yet honest, approach to an extraordinary character. With that same view, he depicts the colorful people and absurd situations of the transition period in an ex-Soviet country. ...

  • The Path Of The Witch

    A film director returns to his native village in the Italian region called Umbria. Trying to discover the secret of a childhood adventure, he explores the surroundings and the community. He takes part in performances that simulate medieval life in the citadel and discovers the legends of the place, asking questions about his relationship with the village in this performative documentary with a mysterious beginning, which continues off the beaten track. ...

  • The Potter From Binis

    A portrait film about a potter from Banat, Ionica Stepan, aged 80, who keeps alive the tradition of six generations of potters. His grandfather used to travel across the Austro-Hungarian Empire to sell his pottery or exchange it for grains. According to tradition, a man could not marry before mastering the art of pottery. The film observes what has remained of the potters' tradition by introducing a remarkable character to the viewer. ...

  • The Power of Suspecting - Eginald Schlattner and the Securitate-Trauma

    Eginald Schlattner, author and prison chaplain, experienced the terror of the Romanian dictatorship first hand. Already at the age of ten, as a member of the German minority, Eginald Schlattner witnessed the turn many Siebenbürger Saxons took towards Nazism. At the end of the '50s, Schlattner, then a student, was arrested by the Securitate. The henchmen torture him with sleep withdrawal and beatings. After months of intense interrogation, having become a convinced communist, he decides to disclose information about a number of authors who were critical of the regime. In his controversial novel, "Red Gloves" (Paul Zsolnay Edition Vienna), Schlattner recapitulates the two years of his imprisonment. The book minutely reveals the psycho-terror of the secret service. In the film we encounter the author, who lives in Siebenbürgen (Transylvania), and several of his comrades-in-fate who survived the crimes of the Romanian regime as political prisoners. The research leads us to former Securitate officers, a former penal camp and to the department for the review of Securitate files. Almost 20 years after the Romanian Revolution of Dec. 1989 Eginald Schlattner's recollections are a challenging contribution to the painful reappraisal of history. ...

  • The Price of Silence

    A silent island. A peaceful monastery with a quiet cemetery and with mute monks… The world is provocative but they should keep quiet. This film is about the silence price of a monk. ...

  • The Proze Of Time

    Trying to solve a problem many people create a new one. In this way we ignore the sacral values of the nation: to grow up a child, to dig up a well and to build a house. The house is left at the mercy of date, the children are abandoned and... the well of our soul is profaned. The salvation will come in the same time with the returning of the nation values. This is the prose of time, the prose which converts in the human drama. ...

  • The Restorer

    Count Tibor Kalnoky was born in Germany, and lived there, as well as in the USA, Holland and France. Some years ago, he decided to settle in Transylvania, being the descendant of one of the oldest Transylvanian noble families. Today he is a public figure and an active participant in the development of the region. When he first went there in search of his roots, he found the two family castles in ruin. The film follows his account of the restoration process, which in the count's opinion must be much more than reconstructing walls. Restoration can be a paradox, as he puts it, and it is difficult to change the face of things without destroying their spirit. The decoration of the rooms, combining tradition and modern comfort with exquisite taste, proves that Kalnoky succeeded to find this balance. More than just a story of the restoration of two old buildings, the film is an allegory of how a man reconnects to the spirit of his roots. ...

  • The Rule of Vera

    n the 50s, the Communist Party honored Vera Rybatchek with the Labor Hero Golden Star. She received this award for achieving record production in the dairy where she worked. She later received praise as the exemplary mother of many children. Vera was one of the faces of communist propaganda, used to promote the model of the new Soviet woman. Today, few remember, and even less care about, her honors. There are also some, in the village, who contest the veracity of her record productions. Vera and her large family must now struggle to survive. The film combines newsreels of Soviet history with glimpses into Vera’s present life. There are interviews with her, her family, and, people in the village. These glimpses portray a hard-working, good-hearted woman. She is someone who, once used by the Soviet propaganda machine, and now lives forgotten in a remote Russian village. In the meantime, the Golden Star medal had to be exchanged for a sack of sugar. ...

  • The Sardine' s Girls

    This film takes a look at the circumstances, culture and environment of women currently working in a cannery in France. Douarnenez, a small town on the coast of Brittany, once boasted twenty canneries. Today, only three are left and they offer jobs to about three hundred women. The camera follows some of them on the production line, where speed and precision are essential skills to keep the aggregate working. Gradually, the viewer comes to know the workers beyond their automatic gestures, finding out what they think about while their hands keep the rhythm of the production line, how they view their condition and what are their expectations. Some are proud of their work while others merely see it as a temporary job. The new employees do their best to keep up with the mechanical pace of the experienced workers, whose movements have become second-nature. Although there is little, if any, time to talk during the work day, the women manage to share hopes and establish friendships that extend beyond the walls of the cannery. ...

  • The School

    THE SCHOOL is a documentary about an intercultural school in Athens serving two communities. More than half of the children are Turkish-speaking Muslims in a city dominated by Greek speaking Orthodox Christians. In an environment often tending to social prejudice and xenophobic nationalism, the teachers are committed to create a "normal" school for children of both communities. For a year, this documentary follows life in the school and in the neighborhood, and intimately looks at the integration of minorities into Greek society. Only recently, has public debate in Greece addressed the ethnic majority's racist perceptions of and discriminations against the minority groups, and the legitimate expectations of these groups to have their language, culture and faith respected and supported by the state and society. Through the examination of the obstacles and difficulties the teachers face, THE SCHOOL attempts to make a broader comment on the effectiveness of individual acts to change racist attitudes and stereotypes. ...

  • The Second Game

    The director, Corneliu Porumboiu, is replaying a 1988 soccer match between Dinamo and Steaua Bucharest alongside his father, Adrian Porumboiu, former international referee. All we see are images from the soccer match commented by the two protagonists. The comments range from political matters to film topics, or direct remarks regarding the game. The long match in which nothing is happening between Dinamo, the Securitate team, and Steaua, the Army team, ends with a draw, 0-0. Corneliu Porumboiu is testing the limits of realism again in this unique cinematic experience. ...

  • The Securitate Hunter

    'Marius Oprea digs out dead bodies. His nickname is the Securitate Hunter because he chases the former officers of the communist political police, called The State Security. Head of a team of young archaeologists, he travels through the country looking for the graves of some 10,000 Romanians who were executed by the Securitate without any trial at the beginning of the 1950s. Marius researches the Securitate archives, contacts the families of the victims, makes his own inquiry and then finds the mass graves of the partisans. The victims of the Securitate can share for the first time their stories with someone who really cares. Since the fall of communism, 20 years ago, Romania has been trying to turn the page of a bleak past. More than a tragic account about recent history this film is the story of a new generation with a new hope for their country. ...

  • THE SHAMANS' REVENGE

    Kara-Ool is the Supreme Shaman of the Tuva Republic. He leads the Bear Spirit Centre in Kyzyl where some ten shamans work regularly. Looking towards the future, he counts on an international development of shamanism and a worldly ecological awareness. Between healings and purifications of all sorts, he tells us about his projects and his vision of the world. ...

  • The Shelter

    An excellent anthropological approach to the everyday life of an old woman, who lives in a modest house in the mountains far from her village of birth. The filmmaker follows her daily routine with great sensitivity, conveying the hardships she faces living alone. The film documents the ethnografic aspects of her rural life, such as bread making, sheep milking, and haycock building, in an organic manner which does not overpower the flow of the story. For her, the days and seasons unfold slowly. Occasionally, the simple pattern of her lonely life is punctuated by news from the village brought by her son. In a slow, yet captivating rhythm, the film succeeds to portray a world very different from our fast-paced reality. ...

  • The Shepherds

    Three shepherds of the Piedmontesse valley of Biella ar living proofs of an ancient way of life, as old as the history of human race itself. Towards the end of spring, they leave the lowlands for the mountains, following the footsteps of their ancestors. They are accompanied by dogs, a few donkeys and the flocks of sheep. They must set off looking for pastures until the coming of fall. It is a sign that one sees less and less these days, but not long ago, this practice used to be passed on from generation to generation. Nowadays there are just a few of them left and very soon there will be nobody willing to live this kind of life, away from the confort offered by the modern world. ...

  • The Shore

    The Black Sea Shores of Turkey are doomed as trucks have begun pouring tons of rock into the sea along the five-mile-long coast irreversibly destroying the shoreline to create a new highway. A culture shaped by the sea is on the brink of extinction. The new highway will stand like a wall between a seafaring people and the wild waves of the Black Sea they have sailed for centuries. ...

  • The Shukar Collective Project

    'The film follows, in a challenging and unconventional visual style, the coming together and the evolution of the Shukar Collective phenomenon. Consequently, the founding members of the dancing bears group Shukar, Napoleon (43, vocal and barrel percussion performer), Tamango (67, vocal and spoon special effects performer), Clasic (29, vocal and percussion performer) as well as those who discovered them: DJ Vasile, Matze, Vlaicu Golcea, Dan Handrabur are talking for the first time about the rising and the breaking up of the group. ...

  • The Shutka Book of Records

    The inhabitants of Shutka, the Romany capital of the world, all share one common passion: being a champion. Shutka thrives on achieving records in songfests, goose fights, dog fights, and vampire hunts, in wearing Sunday best, collecting Turkish music or exterminating evil Genies. Through a number of intertwining stories, this playful, humorous film takes us into a world that is generally closed to outsiders. As the mosaic of Shutka unfolds, we are led to ask ourselves: Where lays the secret of joy? Aren't the smallest things in life often those that make life such an unforgettable experience? Don't look for Shutka on a geographical map. Shutka is a state of mind. ...

  • The Speaking Tree

    The film presents, in monochrome tones, the unusual destiny of a man named Deva, living in the Kutch region (north-west of India). Mother nature has taken his senses, while he was walking his camels into the desert. As a result, his wife left him and took their child with her, and his relatives tied him to a tree. After more than a decade, mother nature creates an earthquake that destroys the entire region, leaving behind hundreds of thousand of victims. Paradoxically, Deva recovers his mental health after this calamity. Sometimes, nevertheless, madness is the safest refuge in front of the modern world chaos. The director Natasha De Betak (com)passionately followed Deva for five years, this absolutely exceptional character who has to chose now between "normality" and "madness." Interviews with family members and images capturing the Indian rural life today contribute to this empathetic, profound and visually splendid portrait. ...

  • The Spectacle

    North Korea is anything but an accessible country. It is not easy to enter it and it is even more difficult to enter it with the purpose of making a documentary film. The main feature line in The Spectacle is the colossal show "Arirang" with thousands of actors performing for thousands of people in the good old communist totalitarian style. The film crosses beyond the grotesque show to offer glimpses of real life in North Korea. ...

  • The Store

    THE STORE is a film about the main Neiman-Marcus store and corporate headquarters in Dallas. The sequences in the film include the selection, presentation, marketing, pricing, advertising and selling of a vast array of consumer products including designer clothes and furs, jewelry, perfumes, shoes, electronic products, sportswear, china and porcelain and many other goods. The internal management and organizational aspects of a large corporation are shown, i.e., sales meetings, development of marketing and advertising strategies, training, personnel practices and sales techniques. ...

  • THE STREET MUSICIAN

    The Street Musician is the story of Peter, a Roma migrant accordion player from Romania, which spends most of the time of the year singing in the streets of Göttingen, Germany. He has lived in Göttingen for almost 20 years now and he is a well-known character of the city as he is singing in the main market but also at private parties. Despite his relatively safe living and success as a street musician, Peter holds inside a deeper burden. Home sickness never abandons the nostalgic soul of an artist. ...

  • The Tale of Nicolai & The Law of Return

    The story of Nicolai begins in a tiny, remote village in the Roamnian region of Moldavia. With the collapse of communism, Nicolai - like many thousands of others villagers - suddenly found himself out of work, so he decided to seek his fortune overseas, far from his family and home. For three years he worked as a guest laborer in Israel, exploited to the hilt by the company that sent him there. He had little contact with his wife, who gave birth in his absence. Finally, determined to gain control of destiny, Nicolai fled his employer and became an "illegal". He was cought by the police and sent to prison, but suddenly his life took an abrupt turn and at once everything changed... Nicolai plays himself in this film, and relieves the dramatic events of his life. as his story unfolds, the film raises ethical questions about life in Israel and the kind of law that defines Israel's national identity. ...

  • The Tanase Dossier

    The film is the reconstruction of the famous espionage case called by the French newspapers "The Tănase affair" (Paris, 1982). The main characters - dissidents Virgil Tănase and Paul Goma, and the spy Matei Haiducu - take part in the reconstruction through recent or past confessions, supported by the accounts of a former vice director of the French counter-intelligence service. The political plot behind the affair is represented by the conflict between the presidents Francois Mitterrand and Nicolae Ceauşescu. The documentary shows the hidden face of Romania during the Ceauşescu regime with regard to foreign affairs and the criminal means employed by the Securitate to bring opponents to silence. ...

  • THE TRUTH ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST

    The history of the Roma population living on Romanian territory spreads over centuries. The earliest testimonies of their presence here date from the distant centuries of the Middle Ages. The period after Romania's unification marked the beginning of a modernization process and social, cultural and political emancipation for the Roma people. Back then nothing foretold the tragedy the Roma would suffer after the beginning of the Second World War. The documentary The Truth about the Holocaust gives voice to the last survivors of the deportation campaign of the Roma to Transnistria. ...

  • THE TUNDRA BOOK. A TALE OF VUKVUKAI, THE LITTLE ROCK

    72 years have passed as deer herder Vukvukai has been living in the depths of Chukotka. He is an old man full of energy and wisdom, the Real Man of Tundra whose life cannot be seen apart from the deer. His people take care of a huge herd of over 14,000 deer. Their life is a non-stop struggle for survival and well-being in the harshest weather conditions of Chaun-Chukotka. They deeply believe in the strength of tradition and thus succeed in their struggle. The ancient culture of Nomadic Chukchi takes care of them, so they preserve and follow it. As far as it is now, their realm remains stable. This is the Truth of Vukvukai. ...

  • The Tv and Me

    Alexa is addicted to television shows. By day, she works as a post woman, sorting and delivering letters. After hours, however, she is a completely different person. Her whole life is focused on TV shows and TV stars. In the past ten years, she has been in the audience of hundreds of television shows. She has surrounded herself with posters, photo albums, and relics. She even goes on “pilgrimages” to visit the hometowns of her idols. The film portrays a woman who lives happily in her illusory world. It also investigates the powerful influence television and its fabricated stars can have on a person’s life. ...

  • The Two of Us

    'This documentary is meant to make a breakthrough in the wall of people's prejudice and intolerance, by glancing into the lives of Cristi and George, two young men whose only "crime" is that they are deeply in love with each other. ...

  • The Two-Wheel Dream

    A documentary about the Finnish man and his two-wheeled dream: The moped. ...

  • The Underground Man

    An important part of the Baltic history - from the Lithuanian perspective. As well as provinding much new information, the film is also a personal portrait of a man of the underground, Jonas Pajaujis, who spent most of his life striving for a free Lithuania, and who at last saw his dream realized. Of the three Baltic states Lithuania showed the most resistence to Soviet domination and for that reason encountered the strongest disinformation attacks from the KGB. ...

  • The Underground Orchestra

    A Venezuelan harp player, a violonist from Sarajevo, an Argentinean piano player, a Malayan singer and a Romanian zither player are the miscellaneous leading characters in this documentary. Although, the film is called "The Underground Orchestra" and initially seems to deal with people who make a living by playing music in the passages of the Parisian subway, the scene of the action gradually shifts to the life above - ground. On the one hand, because shooting a film in the Parisian subway is forbidden since a series of bomb attaks occurred there. On the other hand, an underground world also seems to exist at the surface: many of the musicians who are portrayed have left their native countries for political reasons and are currently living in France as illegal aliens. Their dwellings are tiny "chambres de bonne" under the roofs of the Parisian houses, or overpriced but shabby hotel rooms. Little by little, their musical activities are streamlined. They can be found in the recording studios and concert halls. They have also joined forces in a real "underground orchestra" , that playes underneath the arcades near the Place des Vosges. ...

  • The Undertaker

    Bata is a young Serbian guy working as an undertaker in his father-in-law's funeral company. The business is thriving and its main activity is to bring home Serbian citizens who died abroad or to repatriate the bodies of foreign tourists whose Serbian holiday ended in a tragic way. In the course of the portrayed events, we follow Bata on his journeys between Eastern and Western Europe, as he carries different bodies and witnesses countless family dramas. ...

  • The University Professors

    Through the accounts of some university professors, the film offers a personal view of the recent history of university life in the city of Cluj. It looks at the time period between the end of World War II and the present day. The professors' careers started in the troubled 50s, when the newly installed communist regime was imposing its own system of values. Their professions, as well as their personal lives, flourished at a time when all aspects of life were controlled by the authorities. Through these personal testimonials, the film presents one generation's take on the cultural and academic life at the Cluj University. ...

  • The Unkosher Truth

    A father and his daughter meet and talk. The daughter was grown up in a liberal way, and the father realizes that the 'liberal way' was eventually far too liberal… or maybe it's him who became far too conservative in the meantime… A conflict between generations and a conflict between ways of life. The film is dealing with a series of conflicts between a father who loves his daughter and a daughter who needs her father's warmth. ...

  • The Upper Tisa

    An artistic documentary about the upper reaches of the Tisa river in the Ukraine. We come across wild nature and it's impact on human life and material culture. The text is taken from Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass". ...

  • The Venice Syndrome

    Venice is constantly visited by tourists from all over the world. Twenty million foreigners visited the city last year, which totals to an average of 60.000 people a day. However, at nightfall, Venice turns into a ghost town. Entire neighbourhoods are long since abandoned by their inhabitants, the streets and buildings are empty, offering just a touristic myth to serve business interests. The town has stopped working like an urban structure and is under constant deterioration. This documentary is the portrait of one of the most beautiful towns of the world captured in a process of self destruction. ...

  • The Way to Nowhere Island

    Tamsin Omond, is a rising star of the British environmental movement. She is an energetic, charismatic activist, making the headlines with her participation to demonstrations which frequently end up in her getting arrested. Because her radical actions fail to convert more people to the environmental cause, she decides to adopt a different strategy: taking advantage of her constant presence in the news as a means of getting her message across to a wider audience. However, Tamsin's decision to become and "eco-celebrity" is not to everyone's liking. The documentary tells the story of a fascinating character who is able of anything in her power to change the world, even with the risk of losing the loved ones. ...

  • The Wedding Camels

    Filmed 1974, released 1977. Co-directed by David & Judith MacDougall. A narrative documentary about a wedding among the pastoral Turkana of northwestern Kenya. One of Lorang's daughters, Akai, is going to marry one of his friends and age-mates, Kongu. Because of the close ties between the two men everything should go smoothly, but the pressures within the two families are such that the wedding negotiations over the bridewealth become increasingly tense. Arranging the number and type of animals to be given as bridewealth demands an intricate balance between psychology and economics: Kongu must offer enough animals to please Lorang and his relatives, but not so many that he appears weak or foolish, or depletes his own family's herds. Negotiations drag on for several days, then threaten to break down altogether. The outcome depends not only on traditional patterns of behavior, but also on the influence exerted by Lorang's wives and the manner in which Lorang chooses to resolve the dilemma that confronts him. ...

  • The Wheelchair

    A film about a man who lost his ability to walk at an early age but did not lose his faith in life, in kindness and in his own skills. At one point in his life, he threw away his wheelchair and replaced it with a skateboard he had adapted to suit his condition, because he wanted to be free and to depend on no one. The film looks beyond Banko's personal drama into the general situation existing in Eastern European countries, where people with special needs must rely on their own inventiveness in order to survive. ...

  • The Wired Prut

    The line of barbed wire along the River Prut was meant to separate countries and people. The USSR on one side, Romania on the other. Between them, a line of barbed wire, crossing villages, gardens, orchards, graveyards, and the people's lives. It was put up 66 years ago and is still in position today, 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Meanwhile, the poles rotted and the barbed wire turned into rust, but it is still there, like an ugly memory stinging people's hearts. ...

  • The Wives of Haj - Abbas

    Haj-Abbas built a house with two similar wings for his two wives, bought them the same presents and tried to live in harmony with both of them. After his death, the two old, childless widows remain to live together in the same house. Their everyday lives reveal a strange relationship, and a lifetime of rivalry and conflict has given way to some affection. Their subtle gestures and behaviors toward each other provide a glimpse into what their lives together must have been like for all those years. Beyond the humorous and sometimes ridiculous moments, at the heart of the film is the story of two women who had to find a way to co-exist, and now, facing old age, illness and death, they discover they only have each other for comfort. ...

  • The World According to Ion B.

    The film follows in real life the dream of any man living on the streets: to one day become famous and leave behind a life of poverty, misery and humiliation. Ion Barladeanu is on his way to becoming an important contemporary artist, but in May 2008 he was still an anonymus tramp on the streets of Bucharest. ...

  • The World of Sounds, Traditional Romanian Musical Instruments

    The film presents the diverse, traditional musical instruments of Romania in an encyclopedic manner. The particular sound of each instrument is analyzed from the point of view of its role in the specific tunes of the region from whence it comes. Besides the classic wind and string instruments, things like tree leaves or fish scales are also used to produce music. In describing the variety of traditional instruments, the film draws a musical map of Romania. ...

  • Them and Me

    THEM and ME shows the hidden parts of anthropological fieldwork. How does an anthropologist gain the trust of the people whom he is observing? How does one become integrated into their society? Is it possible to remain distant and objective without inflicting one's own values on the community being observed? Through his lens, he provides the viewer with a glimpse into the lifestyle and behaviors of the aboriginal people he is studying, and further widens that angle of understanding through the use of interviews with community members and his running commentary, which describe his thoughts and reactions to what he witnesses. This film, through its use of community interviews combined with the filmmaker's oral journal, provides one anthropologist's unique and interesting approach to anthropological field work and filmmaking. ...

  • Them and Me

    THEM and ME shows the hidden parts of anthropological fieldwork. How does an anthropologist gain the trust of the people whom he is observing? How does one become integrated into their society? Is it possible to remain distant and objective without inflicting one's own values on the community being observed? Through his lens, he provides the viewer with a glimpse into the lifestyle and behaviors of the aboriginal people he is studying, and further widens that angle of understanding through the use of interviews with community members and his running commentary, which describe his thoughts and reactions to what he witnesses. This film, through its use of community interviews combined with the filmmaker's oral journal, provides one anthropologist's unique and interesting approach to anthropological field work and filmmaking. ...

  • Theory of Numbers

    A based view of an extinguishing world, the Jew Community in Iasi. There were more than 100,000 Jews living in the city before World War II. Out of them, there are not more than a few dozens left today. The meeting of an engineer who emigrated to Israel ten years ago and a young doctor who is about to emigrate to the US shortly is only a pretext for a broader analysis of the condition, the hopes and the prospects of the Jewish Community in Iasi and of its members. ...

  • There was once a village Here

    The dramatic situation affecting that part of the population which was a victim of the forced systematiyation of the villages around Bucharest up to 1989. The villagers tell their sad story to "the magic box". In cine-verite style, we see the inhuman conditions of life in the new housing-blocks. Some escaped, having saved half a house, yet others begin again from scratch. But the symbols of totalitarism, grim tower-blocks, unfinished buildings, countless hydro-electric dams remain. The film offers no solutions but challenges those who dream of a return to the "good old times". ...

  • These Songs and These Silent Nights

    Synopsis: The passengers of a train ferry spend time together and create temporary friendships. A child is telling a woman a reinterpreted version of “Hansel and Gretel”, a group of people are chatting about the rain, another group is discussing foreigners, communication and respect. The film portrays the curiosity we have for the stories of the people we meet. ...

  • Thieves By Law

    "Thieves by Law" gives us access to three former heads of the Russian mafia, one of the most famous criminal organizations in the world. Director Alexander Gentelev reveals how these groups were formed ever since the Stalinist gulag's period during the '30s and continued to exist after 1990. The mobsters, who transformed into reputable businessmen, reveal intimate details on how they came to influence Russia's economy as it emerged from decades of Soviet rule, and how they used their vast wealth to build up a political base in a land that once treated them as common criminals. * Special screening ONE WORLD ROMANIA 2011 at ASTRA FILM FESTIVAL ...

  • Think Global, Act Rural

    What are the common points between the millions of landless workers of the plains of Brazil, a couple of microbiologists in France, the world's biggest organic plantation in Ukraine and Vandana Shina's experimental farms in India? Their struggle: a better soil quality and a wiser access to seeds.Their goals: agricultural self-sufficiency and a better use of limited resources. Multi-awarded filmmaker Coline Serreau, who started her career as a militant documentarist, returns to her grassroot techniques: she travels the world exploring the very concrete local solutions to the global ecological mess. ...

  • Thomson of Arnhem Land

    In 1933, a state of panic erupted in Darwin after five Japanese fishermen and three white men were killed by Aboriginal clansmen on the east coast of Arnhem Land. Donald Thomson, a young anthropologist working in the field, was appalled by calls for a punitive expedition. Thomson suspected the Aboriginal men were resisting invasions of their land and had acted in self defense. At the same time he was aware that the official policy of "protection" of Aboriginals had failed. He volunteered to go to Arnhem Land to try to prevent the race war that people feared. He also proposed to make a scientific study of indigenous culture which he hoped would provide the basis for new policies that would finally bring justice to Aboriginal people. Thomson became more and more isolated from the anthropological establishment, but he continued his fight for Aboriginal rights until he died in 1970. Today, his extraordinary photographs, field notes and artefacts are housed at Museum Victoria and are considered one of the most significant ethnographic collections in the world. ...

  • Those

    David Bohm famously said, “a great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.” Exposing the twisted mechanics of paranoia, “Those” uses a series of interviews with locals to show how the construction of a refugee camp next to a Hungarian town divides its citizens, while proving to be only the tip of a larger iceberg of conflicts. Among this tension, the refugees are shown walking silently, deprived of the right to a voice, as if unwillingly stuck in a performance. Framed by a fairy-tale- like narration, the documentary takes the initial punch-line effect of ignorance and strips it bare, exposing the true basis of repulsion. It is a tale as old as time, our tendency to regard whomever is different from us as a threat to our way of life, be it refugees, immigrants, people from a different region of the same country or even of the same town. ...

  • Thoughts That Once We Had

    Described in an opening text as a “personal history of cinema, partially inspired by Gilles Deleuze,” The Thoughts That Once We Had from master cinematic essayist Thom Andersen is a richly digressive journey through most of film history. A found-footage film composed entirely of unidentified, yet often recognizable film clips and concise intertitles written by Andersen, Thoughts leaps associatively across a vast territory spanning from Griffith to Godard, using dynamically cinematic images and sequences not to explain, but to embody Deleuzian ideas in all their rich ambiguity and nuance. Structuring the film in ways that are alternately witty and puzzling, Andersen free associates from what seems like the totality of cinema, from Erich von Stroheim to Jack Smith, from Maria Montez to Patty Hearst, from Joris Ivens to Pedro Costa and then he suddenly slows things way down with very long comic excerpts featuring Harry Langdon, Laurel and Hardy, then the Marx Brothers. The film veers abruptly into documentary footage devoted to the proletariat, capitalists, communists, Leningrad, Hiroshima, North Korea, Vietnam, then back to WWII footage of Hitler touring Paris. “A wordless, associative, haunted journey – sometimes rueful and sobering, sometimes very funny – not just through the history of cinematic innovation, but through the 20th century itself." — The Guardian ...

  • Three Sisters

    Ying(10), Zhen(6) and Fen(4) are three sisters who live by themselves in a small village in the Yunnan region. Their father works in a town hundreds of kilometres away and is only able to come home on rare occasions, and their mother has left them a long time ago. Patient and peaceful Ying has taken over the care of the household and of her two younger sisters. The girls do not go to school, and they spend most of their time working in the field or wandering about on the roads of the village. One day, however, their father returns and decides to take the two younger sisters with him and to leave Ying in the care of her grandfather. For Ying a new solitary life begins, to which she needs to gradually adapt. ...

  • Tibetan Portraits

    About 18,000 Tibetans live in exile in Kathmandu, Nepal. Most of them know of Tibet only from their parents’ stories. Anthropologist Berit Madsen presents a series of three films, each focusing on the individual experience of young Tibetan exiles. I live in the White Monastery is the portrait of a 12-year old monk, who tells the story of his escape from Tibet and reflects on his life at the monastery. The story of My Father’s Prayer Room, features an 18-year old girl, who lives in a boarding school in India. She returns to Kathmandu to celebrate the Tibetan New Year together with her family, and explains the daily Tibetan religious rituals. The Day of Hundred Thousand Lamps brings to light the preparations for the celebration of an important Tibetan Buddhist God. 100,000 butterlamps must be placed throughout the stupa, which is the monument housing Buddhist relics. The children, who distribute these lamps, clearly take great pride in their work. Beyond the individual experiences, the three portraits tell a single story about exile, Tibetan identity, and human nature. ...

  • Tie Xi Qu: West of Tracks - Rails

    The third part, "Rails" narrows its focus to a single father and son who scavenge the rail yards in order to sell raw parts to the factories. With the factories closing however, their future suddenly becomes uncertain. ...

  • Tie Xi Qu: West of Tracks - Remnants

    The second part, "Remnants" follows the families of many of the workers in an old state-run housing block, "Rainbow Row." In particular, Wang focuses on the teenage children who concern themselves with their own lives but must also cope with their inevitable displacement as Tie Xi's factories continue to close down. ...

  • Tie Xi Qu: West of Tracks - Rust

    In West of the Tracks, filmmaker Wang Bing documents the slow, inevitable death of a massive industrial complex in northeastern China's Shenyang province. Between 1999 and 2001 he meticulously filmed the lives of the last factory workers, a class of people once promised glory during the Chinese revolution. Now trapped by economic change, the workers become deeply moving film heroes in this modern epic. The film is an engrossing portrait of Chinese society in transition. Cahiers du Cinema compares Wang Bing to the great Russian writers and calls his film "a masterful production, an open file on realism." The first portion, „Rust" follows a group of factory workers in three state-run factories: a smelting plant, an electric cable factory and a sheet metal factory. Workers at all three face sub-standard equipment, hazardous waste, and lack of safety precautions. Perhaps even worse, with the declining need for such heavy industry, the factories also face a constant lack of raw materials, leaving the workers idle and concerned for their future. ...

  • Tierradentro. Home of Spirits, Land of People

    Tierrandentro is not simply San Andres of Pisimbala and the Hippogeos and statuary that has been found here. Tierradentro is 1900 square kilometres in the Cacua Departament, where 45.000 natives and a black community live. In addition to the landscape from the snow-capped mountain of Huila, there are hot springs and salt mines scattered all over the region. ...

  • TIME FOR FUN Indonesia, Japan, France, Rwanda, Netherlands

    Japan Kotone, eleven years old, gets out of school every day at four o’clock and goes home with her friends. Before doing their homework, the three girls like to go to a theme park but their merry-go-rounds are a bit shaky and Kotone prefers more calm activities. The parents of Kotone suggest she make a traditional wooden toy, a kite. But it is not easy for a young girl and she will need help. Kotone loves calligraphy. She learns to draw a kanji, a symbol or letter to write on the kite her parents have given her. Like many Japanese children, Kotone is also learning martial arts and after her class, she goes to a café to read mangas. Kotone is a very active little Japanese girl and one of her favorite pastimes is the piano. She plays very well even though she is worried about her exam at the end of the year. But her biggest worry at the moment is the kite. Kotone loves artistic activities. She wants to learn origami. A little paper-folding lesson will allow Kotone to offer her cousin a gift for the Shin shi gosan festival. This festival is also the time to try out her new kite. She hopes it will fly! ...

  • Time for Fun! Turkey, Morocco, Germany, Mali, Brazil, Belgium

    Deniz’s favorite art form is traditional shadow puppets. They call Turkish puppetry Karagoz, the name of a famous puppet character. Between games of backgammon and bicycles rides with his father, social games with his neighbor and games of soccer with his cousin; Deniz doesn’t have a lot of time for his puppets but he wants to put all of his heart into his art. To give him ideas, his parents have taken him to a puppet show. To the rhythm of tambourines and Oriental songs, Karagoz, the mocking and shameless puppet makes his entry. Deniz learns the ropes of a good puppet show. Thanks to his mother, he masters all the stages of making a puppet. The big day has arrived. All of Deniz's family is gathered at his grandmother’s house to see the show. Now it’s his turn to move the puppets! ...

  • Time of the Barmen

    "Time of the Barmen" is one of the most acclaimed works of renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall. It profiles three goatherders in the mountains of eastern Sardinia and, with extraordinary insight and nuance, explores a traditional way of life that is rapidly disappearing as commercial farming displaces herding and young people drift to the coast for the higher pay and glamour of the tourism industry. Pietro, a boy of 17, loyally helps his father in the herding and milking of their goats. His father Franchiscu, 62, would like his son to stay in the mountains but knows he will probably have to leave to further his education and his prospects. Their friend Miminu, in his 40s and still unmarried, knows all his goats by name but faces a future of increasing poverty and isolation. For Pietro, the lives of his father and Miminu provide reference points against which to measure himself and consider his future in a changing world. ...

  • Timisoara. December 1989

    Set in the title Romanian city during the tumultuous fall of communist dictator Ceusescu, this documentary chronicles the attempts of government soldiers to quell a citizens revolt. But during the few days of the uprising a surpeising thing happened - the soldiers joined the citizens. The filmmaker use interviews, video footage of the events and archival photographs to recreate the rebellion, but due to a lack of explanation within the film, the chronicle will be most useful to historians and those well-informed in recent Eastern European history. ...

  • Tito

    The film deals with the personal life of Josip Broz Tito, the man who single-handedly kept Yugoslavia together through sheer force of will for 40 years. Partisan, prisoner, dictator, celebrity, Tito's story is here told by the people who knew him best. Colleagues, friends, and servants all give their account of the man who led strife-torn Yugoslavia from German occupation in World War II and walked it down a political tightrope for 40 years, gaining the respect and admiration of both the Soviet and Western superpowers. ...

  • To Be or Not To Be

    A film about a theatre company in a prison. The prison is the high-security penitenciary in Arad, Romania. The actors? A long list of names, identities, sentences, and crimes. What happens to them, and what happens to us watching as they are punished for our own fears, addictions, and prejudice? After all, we cannot be sure about the point where freedom makes place to feelings of guilt, repentence or … theatre performance. Does this happen behind or outside the prison bars? People are likely to put up performancesall the time, both on stage and in their real lives. ...

  • To Live With Herds

    To Live With Herds is a film about the Jie, a predominantly pastoral people of northeastern Uganda. Following a period of relative isolation under the British Protectorate government, the Jie are now under increasing pressure to exchange their traditional culture and subsistence economy for a cash economy and participation in a modern nation-state. The film examines this predicament in the light of Jie values. The question is not whether change is avoidable, but whether forms of change can be found that extend rather than attack the foundations of Jie life. ...

  • Today I Eat White Chocolate

    The documentary shows the dramatic efforts of those who desperately tried to cross the borders illegally trying to escape Ceausescu's oppressive regime (1965-1989). From all the miseries people were forced to endure, the worst was that they were deprived of the most precious thing for a human being, freedom. The documentary presents six terrifying testimonies, telling a story which was common to manz thousands of Romanians who made the life and death decision to escape the communist regime, to risk their lives and leave the country în search of a better life in a civilized world. ...

  • Today I Was Young and Pretty

    Most of the gypsy population of Clejani, a village located some 50 km away from Bucharest, traditionally consists of musicians going back for many generations. The film shows how musicians relate to daily life and the way their perception of reality influences their music. Firm belief in superstitions, the unavoidable blows of fate, communication with the dead, become the sources of inspiration and expression, of joy and sorrow. Alexandra Guleas unconventional documentary takes us on a musical journey to the origins of romanian gypsy music. ...

  • Today I Was Young and Pretty

    Most of the gypsy population of Clejani, a village located some 50 km away from Bucharest, traditionally consists of musicians going back for many generations. The film shows how musicians relate to daily life and the way their perception of reality influences their music. Firm belief in superstitions, the unavoidable blows of fate, communication with the dead, become the sources of inspiration and expression, of joy and sorrow. Alexandra Guleas unconventional documentary takes us on a musical journey to the origins of romanian gypsy music. ...

  • Tokyo Waka

    Tokyo is an ultra-modern and spectacular city, with a thrilling life during the day as well as at night time. Above the city, however, on the roofs of the buildings, on poles and power lines live 20,000 crows. Since their number are rising alarmingly, the administration of the metropolis finds itself forced to take measures, like hunting them or trying to trap them, destroying their nests and preventing them from feeding from the garbage. However, the crows have adapted constantly, forcing the 13 million inhabitants of the city share the living space with them. Apart from following the behaviour of the crows, the film proves to be an episodic and discursive poem about life and culture in Tokyo, one of the largest cities of the world. ...

  • Tonel And Vieru Or TheMeaning Of The Ballad

    The memory of a tragic accident - a crime that happened fifty years ago at a peasant wedding - was transformed into a ballad. The victim’s father - the one who ordered the ballad – organizes the revenge and another crime. ...

  • Tonel And Vieru Or TheMeaning Of The Ballad

    The memory of a tragic accident - a crime that happened fifty years ago at a peasant wedding - was transformed into a ballad. The victim’s father - the one who ordered the ballad – organizes the revenge and another crime. ...

  • Torment for The Romanian Tongue

    A fresh approach of the work and biography of Mihai Eminescu, the great Romanian poet. Over the years, all the political regimes in Romania used his image in propagandist purposes and constructed a legend around his name. At the 150th commemoration of his death the filmmakers attempt to evaluate the place of Eminescu in the consciousness of ordinary people, beyond the official myth. ...

  • Torna, torna, fratre!

    The Aromanians are remains of an old world slowly dying out. Their language is barely spoken anymore in the Balkans, mostly among the elders. Some assess the number of the Aromanian population at 350.000, others estimate it to be around one million. They are scattered all over the Balkans, in Albania, Greece, Makedonia, Serbia, Bulgaria and Romania. Their name differs from one place to the other: vlahi, rumeri, rămânji, makidonji, armânji etc. This documentary changes the point of view towards an analysis from their own perspective of the Aromanian origins, language and name. The shootings were made in Albania (Moscopole, Korcea), Makedonia (Krusevo, Bitola) and Greece (Sirako, Avdella, Pirivoli). They put together a mosaic of places and people resulting in the portrait of a lost world. ...

  • Toto and His Sisters

    Totonel (10) and his sisters, Andreea (14) and Ana (17), are waiting for their mother to come back home from prison. As they grow up, each of them learns how to survive on their own, hoping that when their mother returns, the family will be reunited. ...

  • TPB AFK: The Pirate Bay Away From Keyboard

    The three rebellious founders of the world’s largest file sharing site, the Pirate Bay, find themselves entangled in a bitter copyright battle with Hollywood and the media industry. Under political pressure from the White House, the court room drama of the Swedish hackers Peter Sunde, Gottfrid Svartholm Warg and Fredrik Neij is the real life thriller of the disruptive innovators behind the world’s most controversial file sharing site. Simon Klose’s TPB AFK is a cinema vérité style documentary thriller that explores the issues a new generation of media consumers are fighting for: an open Internet, free speech and the future of creativity in the digital age. ...

  • Trading Germans

    Not many people know that during the Cold War Romania sold over 250.000 ethnic Germans to West Germany. Hein Günther Hüsch, the secret German negotiator, used to come to Bucharest with a suitcase full of money to recover the freedom of his people. This was also the case of Erika Lazăr, who had to adapt to the new rules of capitalism after she was bought with 47.000 German marks. The film tells the story of the hidden arrangement between the Secret Services of the two states and reveals the events that the characters involved had to go through in this process. ...

  • Train Stop

    Trains travel through the night without stopping. The clatter of the carriages quickly disappears, along with the wail of the locomotive. The people at the station are all asleep. But why are they so exhausted ? And what are they waiting for? ...

  • Train to Adulthood

    The first 15 minutes of the coming-of-age TRAIN TO ADULTHOOD seem taken out of a utopic world living in an unreliable timeframe, where the employees of a railway station work hard at their job willingly; it’s also a surrealist world, seeing that the age of the “employees” is somewhere between 10 to 14. But the utopia quickly crumbles, once director Klára Trencsényi turns her attention to the stories of two families from Budapest and we come to realize that Gergő and the twins Carmen and Viktor choose to work in this summer camp only as a way to escape the precarious reality from back home. Gergő’s parents are working abroad, in Germany, while the twins’ mother is about to lose her house and can barely make ends meet all by herself. In the course of two years, Trencsényi follows the heartbreaking process of three preadolescents having to grow up almost overnight, highlighting the anachronistic role that a space belonging to the past - intended for the pioneers by the former Communist regime - plays in their present-day lives, when the end of their childhood is likely to be taken over by uncertainty and disillusionment. ...

  • Transylvania Mythica

    The villagers in the Apuseni Mountains in the Carpathians celebrate St. George's Day by performing a ritual rooted in the pre-Christian times. The ritual was originally designed to purify people and their animals, and ensure the fertility of land for the coming agrarian year. Similarly, it was meant to keep away evil spirits, who were likely to descend on earth on that particular night. This film follows the ritual as it happens today, giving voice to the performers' current interpretations of its meaning. ...

  • Transylvanian (Love)Stories

    Soon after the fall of the communist regime, in the town of Târgu-Mureș, Romania, an extremely violent conflict broke out between Romanians and Hungarians. The outcome has had long-term effects on the two ethnic communities. Although 25 years have passed, people are still living in closed communities, trying as much as possible to avoid contact with „the others”. The film tries to shed light on the lives of people living in mixed families, caught between two parallel worlds in permanent conflict. ...

  • Transylvanian Tale, A

    A stranger arrives in Posaga, a small village in Transylvania, trying to find out if Dracula’s legend is real. He talks to the village elders, he investigates, asks questions and listens to their stories. In the end he uncovers a new side of the legend and the fact that his alter ego from another life was here before. This is a fictional documentary that combines local legends about supernatural powers with personas of the protagonist, symbolically named „The Stranger”. ...

  • Trapped by Law

    The room is completely dark and empty apart from a spotlight that shines on a young man sitting in an armchair. Another shot, same scene shows us a second man. The two are brothers, here to tell their story of how a single night stripped them of their nationality, identity and sense of safety. Diving into the absurd intricacies of the legal system, the documentary “Trapped By Law” follows two Roma brothers over the course of five years, starting with their sudden overnight deportation from Germany to Kosovo, from where their family fled thirty years back. Director Sami Mustafa splits his film into chapters, in an attempt to mark the crucial moment of this odyssey and make sense of all that is happening, while he himself gradually becomes a protagonist in the story. Investigating the meaning of nationality and the different layers of forced displacement, the film mixes on-site footage with post-factum interviews, creating an intimate portrait of the two brothers as they try to return to their families and the country that cast them away. ...

  • Treasures

    Every morning after following his usual routine, a lone old man goes on the beach with a metal detector looking for possible treasures buried in the sand, while an elderly woman watches him from her lounge chair. The film is a hybrid between a documentary about a couple whose marriage has lasted for 60 years and a short feature in which the “actors” are precisely the two of them. Thus, two romance stories are created that symbolically intertwine with each other. ...

  • Trip to Romania

    French jazz composer and trumpet player Michel Marre, an admirer of Romanian traditional music, decided to make a research trip to Romania. Shot and edited in an informal style, the film follows his journey. His experiences are used as a pretext to reveal subjective impressions and experiences of the Western musician meeting his Romanian colleagues in their own environment. ...

  • True Cost

    This is a story about clothing. It’s about the clothes we wear, the people who make them, and the impact the industry is having on our world. The price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, while the human and environmental costs have grown dramatically. The True Cost is a groundbreaking documentary film that pulls back the curtain on the untold story and asks us to consider, who really pays the price for our clothing? Filmed in countries all over the world, from the brightest runways to the darkest slums, and featuring interviews with the world’s leading influencers including Stella McCartney, Livia Firth and Vandana Shiva, The True Cost is an unprecedented project that invites us on an eye opening journey around the world and into the lives of the many people and places behind our clothes. ...

  • Truth

    The short film tells the story of a pottery artist living in a village near Iasi. In 1971, Agapi started an experiment – he travelled the Modavian countryside with a mobile photo lab and took pictures of the locals. That is how he met Toader Nica, whom he photographed and filmed for several years. Today, Toader Nica is the most famous name among black ceramic artists. ...

  • TURN OFF THE LIGHTS

    Three young men are released from prison. Three destinies that become one. This is the story of Alex, a streetwise convict trying to deal with his own contradictions in straight time. Being guilty or not depends on the circumstances and the borders that each destiny may cross. Turn Off the Lights is a matter of survival in the grey shaded areas of morality. ...

  • TVT (Lifelong Torture)

    Two brothers, Richard and Ferencz Hayek, tell the story of their life, the story of their family, the story of a continuous torture: their uncle - shot in the head by the communists, their 15 years old sister - raped and murdered also by the communists, themselves - harassed by their neighbors and by the post-revolutionary Romanian Police. The documentary listenes to their stories, in an attempt to make people understand and learn from their terrible experience. ...

  • Twin Sisters

    In 2003, a pair of twin girls were found abandoned in a Chinese village and put separately for adoption. Soon, one was adopted by a Norwegian family and the other by an American one. Through series of coincidences, the parents meet each other during the adoption procedure in China and discover the girls are sisters. They grow up with the knowledge that they each has a twin sister living on the other side of the world and at the age of eight, they finnaly meet each other in Norway. ...

  • Two Or Three Things About Activism

    Two or Three Things about Activism is a counter-documentary based on a distinction made by Godard between making a political film and making film politically. While different protagonists discuss their perspectives on Romanian activism, the voiceover reflects on the motivations behind the video. Two or three things about Activism begins with a richness of sound and image, immersing the viewer in the stories of activists, but becomes increasingly more bare and fragmented, preventing an easy identification. The video aims to become a tool for self-reflection - it doesn't represent Romanian activism, but tries to intervene in it from the inside, to provoke change. ...

  • Two Sisters

    It's been ten years since the Kosovo War is pver. However, the wounds are still visible and the earth is still full of antipersonnel mines. The film speaks about two women who struggle to clean up the soil of the ordures of the war. It is a story of devotion, courage and most of all ideals in a world that has lost its ideals. ...