Centrul Astra Film

 

 

Astra Film Festival

Film catalogue

0-9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

  • La maison de la radio

    The documentary invites us to spend twenty four hours in the backstage of the national radio station Radio France. Along the corridors, in the recording studios, on a motorcycle that accompanies the cyclists from the Tour de France, or together with a "storm hunting" photographer, the filmmaker skilfully presents charismatic and savoury characters. Among them are a news editor with a sense of humour, an anchor training to present the latest news or a dedicate producer who knows from the first clue how to get what he wants from a subject. Throughout the film, we discover the entire production process of a mass media institution and the people behind it who, especially in the case of a radio station, usually remain invisible. ...

  • Lalla Tama'zuzt's Travels

    "Beloved Lady" is the surname given by the village people to the young teacher who stayed with them in Kabylie from 1937 to 39. Fifty years later she has been been invited back to celebrate the publication of her book and the exhibition on her work giving public recognition on the ethnographical notes and photographies she made at the time. This testimonz of women-s daily life in the before World War II period is as much a contribution to Algeria cultural heritage as to the immigrants world in France. She arrived on donkey back the first january, 1937 to a snow convered mountain village, hard primitive conditions of life, hardlz anz means of communication, rudimentary means of transport. Food was scarce and she shared that life with the women folk. But she had a special mission, given her by the ministery to enshure that schooling was available to all and not just attended by a priviledged few, the "colonists" as was the case up to then. She took great interest in the women's art of weaving and helped them to organize their workshop. Throught this she developped such strong deep bonds with the people that they gave her the suname of "Beloved Lady". Today in Algeria we met people whi would like to change many things in their country: schooling, birth control, economy, women's condition, and culture. Language is a problem too. An activist berber finishes the film with these words: "We have been fighting for twenty years to get our berber language recognized, to have it institutionalized " for it's the national language of this country and it should be recognised as such by the authorities. This is how we conceived access to modernity and also the democratization of this society. We have no complexes, we are at ease within ourselves and that's also why we haven't got the same problems regards integrism as other people in Algeria. We are muslims, we are algerians and we are open to modernity. We are mediteraneean." ...

  • Landscape

    A provincial Russian town. A cold winter day. People waiting for the bus. The camera slowly pans over faces, while we hear scraps of conversations. Under the appearance of a candid-camera documentation, we discover a keen eye for relevant details which make up the picture of the miseries and worries of Russian every-day life. Landscape experiments with cinema language, using almost exclusively left-to-right long tracking shots cut to give the impression of a continuous camera movement. ...

  • Landscape

    A provincial Russian town. A cold winter day. People waiting for the bus. The camera slowly pans over faces, while we hear scraps of conversations. Under the appearance of a candid-camera documentation, we discover a keen eye for relevant details which make up the picture of the miseries and worries of Russian every-day life. Landscape experiments with cinema language, using almost exclusively left-to-right long tracking shots cut to give the impression of a continuous camera movement. ...

  • Last Call

    The human exponential development is out of proportion to the limited resources of the Earth and this can lead to disaster. This was the message sent out by the authors of the book “The Limits Of Growth”, which analyses the results of the first programme to simulate the interactions between the Earth and human systems. Then, there was still a way to slow things down, but is there any solution to the present situation? ...

  • Last Train Home

    ''I hardened my heart and left', says Chen Suqin in an attempt to explain her decision to leave with her husband, some fifteen years before, to work in the highly industrialized Guangdong region, leaving their two small children alone with their grandparents in a small farming village. Ever since, the only time the parents could see their children was during the Chinese New Year national holiday - the time of the biggest mass migration in the world, allegedly involving around 130 million Chinese citizens who plunge the country's train stations into chaos. Completed over several years in classic verité style, Last Train Home is an intimate and candid debut film which starts with the epic spectacle of the tidal wave of humanity struggling to make it to the trains, and draws us into the fractured lives of an emotionally estranged migrant family crushed by the dramatic changes sweeping contemporary China. ...

  • Leaving Greece

    In 2008, three Afghan youngsters take refuge in Greece, searching for peace, freedom and prosperity. However, Greece is affected by economicam crisis and the three of them have to find a way to get to another European country. The borders of Greece are some of the best monitored in the continent, so they have to try to be legit and ask for asylum, but that takes risks which endanger their friendship and lives. ...

  • Leaving Transylvania

    After the collapse of communism in Romania, thousands of ethnic Germans emigrated from Transylvania to Germany. The exodus continued year after year. The young Saxons, or ethnic Germans, were eager to leave Romania dreaming of a prosperous future in the West. For the elder, however, migration was a traumatic experience. Leaving Transylvania documents this dramatic situation seen trough the eyes of an elderly couple from a village called Arbegen / Agirbiciu. Hans and Maria Kenzel, aged 70, are two of the very few who decided to stay. The Kenzels look after the local church fortress, ring the bells and wind up the clocks. Dusting off pews in the huge empty church seems to be their only link to the old times. They have two options: to leave everything behind them or to stay. ...

  • Left on Purpose

    Midway through a film shoot about his life in the anti-war movement, Mayer Vishner, a 1960s radical, declares that his time has passed and his last political act will be to commit suicide and he wants it all on camera. Now the director must decide whether to turn off his camera or use the film to keep his friend alive. Mayer found his place in the 60s counterculture in 1965 at the age of 16 and the strong ties to the community of activists of which he was a part gave his life focus and meaning. ”Left on Purpose” confronts the growing issues of depression, isolation and aging through an intense character driven story of the relationship between filmmaker and subject. It provides a rare cinematic look at what it means to be a friend to someone in pain. ...

  • Let Our Songs Live

    This film was made by the invitation of the Siriono indians living in Ibiato a village in the jungles of Northern Bolivia. The Siriono used to be nomads but today live in a missionary founded village. In the eyes of the short-time visitor Ibiato may look like any Bolivian lowland village, but below the surface the old culture and religion are still alive. We follow the Siriano on longer expeditions into the jungle, take part in a grave-ritual, see a medicine woman curing a partient. There is no voice-over. ...

  • LET'S DANCE - Argentina, Bretannia, Georgia, Finland, Italy, Cypru

    Little dancing-heroes from all over the world show us their music and folklore. Dancing is a vivid emblem of a country and a culture. In Europe, the USA, Africa, Asia and South America, melodies and the gestures that go with them are constantly present in daily life and in ceremonial occasions. The hero of each episode is a child dancer. We follow him in his daily activities, among them dance classes and rehearsals as well as preparing costumes. We also attend special events in the culture's folklore, as our escort performs in front of an audience. The child will then act as our guide in these typical festivals and ceremonial occasions. We will discover the “artists'” costumes, accessories, head-dresses and make-up. Beyond the folk element, each episode will focus on the story and the world of one child: his dreams, desires, artistic sensibility, and his first steps in what may, one day, become his profession. As music and dancing are wonderful direct ways of introducing children to different countries and cultures, this series uses dancing as a means of exploring a specific cultural universe. It provides young viewers with an informative way of better understanding other people, and respecting their cultures and differences. ...

  • Let's Dance! Kazakhstan, Mexico, Greece, Israel, Finland

    In Kazakh, Jouldouz means "star". It is a fated name for a girl who dreams of becoming a principal dancer one day. She is a student at Kazakhstan’s school for artists. Jouldouz starts with some finger-loosening exercises. The fingers play an important part in traditional Kazakh dances because they follow the body movements, completing them, and making them more graceful. Jouldouz’ grandmother is finishing off her embroidered vest. This traditional Kazakh dance costume leaves the arms bare for maximum grace. She has thirty musicians and a costume worthy of a Kazakh princess. The pace quickens and she starts to whirl: that’s it - she has earned her role in the tour! ...

  • Letter

    An isolated village in the North-West of Russia. An old wooden house hosts a mental hospital. The place and the people seem untouched by civilization. The black and white image, set in a hallo that reminds of the fog of rural mornings, presents ghostly characters going on with their daily activities. In this pure, primordial framework, no human voice is heard. The dialogues are mute, and the enigmatic faces suggest a symbolic dimension, transmitted through the senses, through a combination of suffering and anonymity, thus creating a texture of sounds full with untold personal stories. ...

  • Letter to the Dead

    The approach of the year 2000 caused a whirlwind of concern in a small village in Papua New Guinea. Rumors about a possible computer catastrophe had reached this remote island, and even there the people worried about the security of their money made from selling palm oil that they keep in bank accounts. Moreover, there is a religious dispute going on, as representatives of several Christian missions try to attract the villagers to their church. While quarreling about the pros and cons, they pay less attention to the rituals that honor the dead. According to traditional belief, the dead help their living relatives, who in their turn must celebrate them by holding special ceremonies. As not much help has come from the dead ancestors lately, people tend to believe that they moved away because they felt neglected. Maybe they moved to a rich country, possibly the one from whence the filmmakers came, or perhaps they left for fear that the white people would put them to work. In exploring the reactions of the villagers caught between tradition and modernity, the film addresses the current issue of identity vs. globalization. ...

  • Letter to the Dead

    The approach of the year 2000 caused a whirlwind of concern in a small village in Papua New Guinea. Rumors about a possible computer catastrophe had reached this remote island, and even there the people worried about the security of their money made from selling palm oil that they keep in bank accounts. Moreover, there is a religious dispute going on, as representatives of several Christian missions try to attract the villagers to their church. While quarreling about the pros and cons, they pay less attention to the rituals that honor the dead. According to traditional belief, the dead help their living relatives, who in their turn must celebrate them by holding special ceremonies. As not much help has come from the dead ancestors lately, people tend to believe that they moved away because they felt neglected. Maybe they moved to a rich country, possibly the one from whence the filmmakers came, or perhaps they left for fear that the white people would put them to work. In exploring the reactions of the villagers caught between tradition and modernity, the film addresses the current issue of identity vs. globalization. ...

  • Leviathan

    Filmed completely aboard a fishing ship in New England, the documentary offers a unique stylistic and visual experience: nearly 90 minutes of sounds and images - wind, water, noises, processing mechanisms and struggling fish. The entire industrial process, the daily routine of people working aboard the fishing vessel, the nature, life and death on the sea, are captured in great detail, wordless, object to pure observation, without bias or preconceptions. The shots filmed from multiple angles and spots, simultaneously, with the help of small digital cameras placed in the corners of the ship, on the fishermen's helmets or in the water, expose continuously the reality of a visceral cinematographic examination. ...

  • Life in Fresh Air

    Today, the Yugoslavian wars may seem remote to most of the world. Since they were making the headlines, there have been so many conflicts and tragic events. The locals, however, still have to deal with the aftermath. It is one thing to discuss the complex issues of ethnic conflicts and refugees at round tables and in official meetings, yet it is completely different to deal with these issues in the field. The rural village of Djulovac in eastern Croatia is far removed from the political and administrative mainstream. Still, the local community is confronted with ethnic dissension. There are the native Serbs, who had rebelled in 1991, and the native Croats. There are also the Croat refugees from Kosovo, who are trying to make a fresh start. The film follows the stories of the people of Djulovac. It shows the strategies created and used by the community officials in their attempt to facilitate communication between all the present inhabitants of the village. ...

  • Life is Elsewhere

    Life in a nunnery. Nuns and their neighbours speack about their expectations and their relationship with "the outside world". ...

  • Life may be

    A film structured as a letter is transformed into a cinematic discourse and a personal story between two well-known directors. Mark Cousins, the British director and film critic, and Mania Akbari, Iranian actress and director, are composing a cinematographic essay debating complex cultural issues such as gender, politics, corporeality and artistic sensibilities. This documentary offers an intimate foray in the minds of the two authors, which blossoms into a beautiful love affair. ...

  • Life Sentences

    Fawzi, an Arab man, marries a Jewish woman. They live in quiet harmony within the Arab-Jewish community with their son and daughter. After it is discovered that the father is behind dozens of mysterious terror attacks in the late 1960s, the mother flees the country with her kids to the other side of the world and settles in Montreal's ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. No-one suspects the real identity of the children. When they grow up, the two will take opposite roads. Even though freed by the Jibril Agreement in 1985, the father's life sentence never truly ends, and neither does the life his son is sentenced to as a result of his father's actions. The real imprisonment the documentary explores is that of Fawzi's son, Nimer, and his family ties. ...

  • Life under the Arctic Sky

    This documentary takes the viewerto a breathtaking journey two hundred miles north of the Arctic Circle, near the jagged tips of Norway's crown, the sun does not set for weeks on end during the summer months, and the midnight sun bounces off fields of midsummer snow. Here is the Sami's homeland, spread across northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The Sami are some of Europe’s last indigenous peoples, reindeer herders who for thousands of years have lived a nomadic lifestyle in the Arctic wilderness. For them, the notion of time is untethered from the cycles of the sun and is tied instead to something far more important: the movement of the reindeer. ...

  • Lindenfeld 1994, Portrait of a Village

    Two men and a woman, all three eldery, are the last inhabitants of this one-time prosperous village, founded in 1828 by a froup of ethnic Germans. The yhree old people who live in isolation have retained nothing but hate for each other and faith in their Lord, the tin image of wich hangs insecurelly on a nail opposite the abandoned village church. ...

  • Liquid Journeys

    For the young Polish immigrants living in London, identity is a constantly changing process. Young Polish people, as well as old-aged ones, discuss national identity, UK communities and the places where they belong. This expository documentary is based on testimonials and it presents an exploration of people who are trying to discover and reinvent themselves in a reality full of uncertainty and thirsty for globalization. ...

  • Lisdoonvarna, Lourdes of Love

    County Clare is a remote region on the sparsely populated West Coast of Ireland. It is not easy to find a woman in this deserted land. That is why the Lisdoonvarna matchmaking festival is organised every year, a tradition that goes back two centuries. Pub-owner, horse-trader and matchmaker Willy Dale enjoys helping bachelors find a suitable partner. Quarryman Mihal Nagle lives alone with two dogs and two donkeys. He has a drinking problem and likes to gamble. He is convinced that a woman could change his life. Farmer Paddy Coughlan is an introvert and religious man who has been taking care of his parents for a long time. At 67 he is so used to living alone that the thought of having a wife has become rather a fantasy. He has been to Lisdoonvarna festival many times without success. Handyman Jamesie Keeting, a man completely dominated by his mother, hopes to meet the love of his life one day. All three men are determined to find the right woman at the Lisdoonvarna Festival. ...

  • Little Land

    Since the beginning of the crisis in Greece, a growing number of unemployed Athenians have decided to move to the countryside, hoping to change their lives for the better. Among them is Theodoris, 35, who settled in Ikaria, a remote island in the Aegean sea. He discovers there a local functional economy, a small society with a unique culture of autonomy and cooperation, where people’s lives are not only better but also longer. It is one of the few "blue zones" of the world. The film aims to bring out the secret of the Ikarians, whose completely different life could become relevant for us in times of economic and social upheaval. ...

  • Little People Big Dreams

    A millionaire wanted to create a utopia for little people in China. A land where they could live and work among themselves, away the discrimination of mainstream society. And so the ”Dwarves Empire” was born. This is an unlikely theme park where dozens of little people reside and perform for anyone who pays an entrance fee. The observational documentary traces the journeys of a few employees at a pivotal point in their lives. A change of heart, a secret escape, a struggle to find true love and a venture beyond the confines of the ‘Dwarves Empire’ lead to vastly different experiences. Connected by a will to pursue their dreams and a life of happiness, these little people take their chances in an uncertain world. For some, their destinies are forever changed. ...

  • LIUDIANS

    The Liudians are a small population living in Karelia. During the time of the Soviet Union their identity was erased, but their language and myths are still alive. ...

  • Living a Reel Life

    Bollywood is the center of the film industry in Tamil, on the southeast coast of India. The film industry provides a living for about one fifth of the local population. The film follows the lives of two women, who are both linked, in different ways, with the cinema production. Praveena is a film school student. The training she gets prepares her for a camerawoman job in the commercial film industry. However, she would rather work in documentary filmmaking. The other character is Suhasini. She is a famous actress, having starred in almost two hundred films, and film director. She can competently judge the internal mechanism of the film industry, as well as, the position of women in this male-dominated business. Insertions from popular films, produced in Kollywood, colour and highlight the reflections of the characters. ...

  • Living with Gods

    They say Chinese Gods enjoy the same things as humans. These things include theater performances, films and puppet shows. Mei-Hua and Zui-Pin work with the Chinese Local Opera, presenting shows of traditional Taiwanese theater for temple festivals. They perform for the Gods, and for the human audience, who eventually pays them. The shows were very popular some thirty years ago. Today, the temples cannot afford inviting theater troupes very often. While the human audience is in decline, the actors perform for the Gods alone. The film observes the two actresses as they struggle to keep their business running, in spite of various competitors. A rival troupe attempts to steal their contracts. Television, also has taken away a large part of their traditional audience. This is a realistic film about preserving tradition, not for the sake of tradition itself, but as a way to survive. ...

  • Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World

    In LO AND BEHOLD, REVERIES OF THE CONNECTED WORLD, the Oscar-nominated documentarian Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man, Cave of Forgotten Dreams) chronicles the virtual world from its origins to its outermost reaches, exploring the digital landscape with the same curiosity and imagination he previously trained on earthly destinations as disparate as the Amazon, the Sahara, the South Pole and the Australian outback. Herzog leads viewers on a journey through a series of provocative conversations that reveal the ways in which the online world has transformed how virtually everything in the real world works - from business to education, space travel to healthcare, and the very heart of how we conduct our personal relationships. ''Another way to look at Lo and Behold is not as an inquiry into ideas but rather as a collection of interesting human specimens.'' (A. O. Scott, The NYTimes) ''With interviewees ranging from Elon Musk to a gaming addict, Werner Herzog presents the web in all its wildness and utopian potential in this dizzying documentary''. (Lanre Bakare, The Guardian) ...

  • Lobotomy

    The Russian-Georgian war becomes the underlying subject of this film. How did it happen, that all one hundred and forty five million Russians underwent a lobotomy - a brain operation? Award-winning director Yury Khashchavatski uses the basis of the Russian-Georgian war to explore the methods and techniques that the Russian media uses to brainwash its citizens. ...

  • Local Colour

    A comprehensive picture of an autumn morning in Budapest, constructed with an extraordinary visual and anthropological perceptiveness. Following the listeners of Radio TILOS (Hung. "forbidden") - an alternative radio station - during a Friday morning broadcast, the film introduces people of various backgrounds from different parts of the city and outlines the metropolitan experience in Eastern Europe. ...

  • Long Way Home, The

    20 years ago our film crew, while shooting in an orphanage, witnessed a roma mother, Svetla, leaving her newly born son Ilya there. Four years later Ilya was adopted in France. The abandoned roma baby has turned into a handsome, educated, well mannered Frenchman who comments confidently on his own adoption. Ilya’s adoptive mother was asking for years on end if there was a way to find his biologic mother and to visit his seven brothers and sisters in Bulgaria. Our film reveals these emotional meetings and the suspicion and surprise of the collision of cultures… The film also rises questions on the fate of other children who were adopted in front of our cameras while shooting The Long Way Home.- Bulgaria is the only EU member that allows international adoptions. ...

  • Longest Night: A Winter’s Tale

    "The Longest Night: A Winter's Tale" is a one-of-a-kind fulldome planetarium show that captures its audience with a timeless fable of courage, generosity and renewal. Its story explores the concept that winter is a time for Earth to rest, waiting for new growth in the spring. Its star, a young girl born into a family of nomadic storytellers, embarks on a simple quest that leads her to a dragon's nest. What will she discover there, and how will it help her save her village? Morehead Planetarium collaborated with Paperhand Puppet Intervention to develop the story and visuals of "The Longest Night." The Morehead production team seamlessly wove together live-action video of Paperhand's world-class puppeteers with beautiful and intricate fulldome animation to create this innovative and imaginative show. ...

  • Look At The Life Through My Eyes

    This is the story about very closed, very sole world located in one village in Macedonia, village where life is like a fairy-tale, almost like lived in another time and space. People there look at the life through their eyes, very slowly accepting changes from the outside world, like not wanting to be part of it. They like to keep quiet about anything that does not fit into their fairy tale. The wishes, the fears, the fights, the secrets stay hidden behind the closed and high gates of the houses. ...

  • Look of Silence, The

    Through Joshua Oppenheimer’s work filming perpetrators of the Indonesian genocide, a family of survivors discovers how their son was murdered and the identity of the men who killed him. The youngest brother, an optometrist named Adi, is determined to break the spell of silence and fear under which the survivors live by confronting the men responsible for his brother's murder and asking them to accept responsibility for their actions while testing their eyesight. ”The Act of Killing” exposed the consequences for all of us when we build our everyday reality on terror and lies. ”The Look of Silence” explores what it is like to be a survivor in such a reality. This powerful companion piece to ”The Act of Killing” initiates and bears witness to the collapse of fifty years of silence. ...

  • Losers and Winners

    For one and a half years, filmmakers Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken watch as a gigantic industrial site is dismantled, documenting the stories accompanying its disappearance: how the coke workers in the industrial Ruhr Region experience the arrival and working methods of the Chinese, their feelings upon seeing their pride in their work vanish along what was the most modern coke factory in the world, but also the strain and conflicts the Chinese workers are subjected to during their 60-hour work week far away from home and family, caught between euphoria and doubts about their future. Two worlds collide. But who is ultimately the winner and who the loser when jobs and the "economic miracle" that made them possible leave the country of their origin and a whole region of Germany experiences first-hand the impact of the phenomenon of globalization, while in the Middle Empire new visions come and go with each passing day? ...

  • Losing Sonia

    „Losing Sonia“ shows how a seemingly rigid monastery can be a place full of life, beauty and artistic expression. Sonia, a young nun, paints icons at night and then sleeps until noon. She has a dog, cats, exotic birds, and a body that rebelled against the strict rigour of the monks. Trying to understand her and the meaning of her choices in life, we come to Sonia’s family, marked by the history of Russia. At the same time, the film is a journey inside the Orthodox church, showing that the deep spirituality of the nation is being reborn. „Losing Sonia“ tells the story of an unusual woman who tries to rebuild the values ussian society has lost under successive political regimes, and she does this within the walls of a monastery. ...

  • Lost In Transition

    Dado arrived in Serbia as a serbian refugee from Croatia. The war that made an end to Yugoslavia also ended his carefree childhood on the countryside. His dream is to become a famous actor, but so far he never had enough energy to start his studies. Lost in Transitions tells the story of this generation in serbia that grew up during the nineties and that now tries to find a way into the future. ...

  • Lost World

    The life, demolition and reconstruction of Kopaszi dam. Shot ten years long in a forgotten landscape in the centre of Budapest. People living in houseboats and wooden houses, struggling against flood, snow and investitors who want them to evict. ...

  • Lovage

    Forty days after Easter, at Ascension Sunday, the villagers of Sibiel take part in a unique ritual which betrays its pagan origins long after the triumph of Christianity. The cross and the plant lovage are celebreted in a festival which recalls the agrarian fertility rites of myth and folklore. ...

  • Love History

    Female descendants of Nazi perpetrators and followers talk about their family members and relate the stories to their own lives. In the process, the film remains in public space. Scandalous facts like the acquittal of Nazi criminals in Austria are listed more than told, while the camera is aimed at public buildings. The facts speak for themselves and do not need to be emphasized with stirring images. ...

  • Love Stories from Moscow 1993-2009

    In 2008, German filmmaker Christoph Boekel returns to Moscow to complete a film project he had started in 1993. His film follows seven characters close to him, they are family or friends. The filmmaker sketches small family protraits, telling about love stories, crossed ways, meetings and separations. The overall image is that of a fresco of Moscow intellectual circles in the context of the tremendous social, political, and economical change of the recent years. The parallel montage collates two worlds, the old and the new, populated by the same people, members of three generations. There is a personal approach, sentimental and contemplative, and the construction puts together matters, moods and testimonies of people bound to the author in a special relationship. The city appears gradually, in intermezzos showing places where time has erased the details, to leave an almost completely changed space, within which old structures have vanished and a new city has popped out. ...

  • Low Cost

    The first Romanian documentary on the local impact of globalization brings together two groups of female-workers from two factories belonging to the same Franco-Romanian company. At one point, the French owner has to make a decision. Instead of firing a number of French workers, he offeres them a job at one of the company's branches in Medias, Romania. The film analyses in honesty and empathy the meeting of the two cultures, deciding that there is not a question of a culture clash. The workers, be they French or Romanian, manage to establish communication, even if they do not speak the same language. After all, they are confronted with similar difficulties, and the low salaries payed by the employer is the most important of them all. The film does not attempt to reject globalization, nor to demonize employers on behalf of the employees. It is rather a discreet insight into people's everyday joys and dissatisfactions. ...

  • Lucky Castle - Hotea

    Lucy Castle, a young English woman came to the village Hoteni in Maramureş, in the north of Romania to do research for her PhD in ethnomusicology. There she ended up getting married to a local four years younger than herself with a rather poor education, Ion Hotea. People in the village are disappointed by Lucy's choice. They say Ion is a violent guy who drinks too much. Lucy was planning to settle down in her husband's village. Yet, the Castle-Hoteas are now in England. People in the village say Ion had had that in mind from the very beginning. ...

  • Lucky Draw

    Although not recorded and studied by psychologists or sociologists, the prolongued youth syndrome is frequent in Serbia. The term refers to people in their late twenties or even in their thirties, who are compelled to live with their parents because they have no other housing option. Jelena's family lives in Belgrade. Three generations live under one roof. At 27, Jelena wants a place of her own. Her father refuses to lend her the money she needs for the rent, but her mother is supportive. She collects coffee-bags, because the prizes offered by a promotional campaign for a coffee brand could be the answer to Jelena's problem. ...