Centrul Astra Film

 

 

Astra Film Festival

Film catalogue

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  • Kalahari Family, Part One: A Far Country

    Thus Oma Tsamkxao, a Ju/'hoan hunter of the Kalahari Desert, recalls his first encounter with the ethnographic filmmaker, John Marshall, in 1951. John, his sister, and their parents had come to the Kalahari to study the last independent hunter-gatherers in southern Africa. A FAR COUNTRY documents the lives of the Ju/'hoansi engaged in their ancient economy based on hunting game with poisoned arrows and gathering wild bush foods. The film also chronicles the early years of a relationship between the Marshall family and the Ju/'hoansi that would last for more than a half century. In their own words, ≠Oma, his wife !U, and members of their extended family relate their personal histories and describe Ju/'hoan society. ≠Oma recounts the tale of a days-long giraffe hunt. "Women do important things, just like men. It's we women who fed the people." And indeed, the Marshalls learn that bush-foods gathered by women and girls provided 80% of the Ju/'hoan diet. Ju/'hoansi were self-sufficient in the 1950s, but the old life was hard. "We were owners of thirst and owners of hunger," says ≠Oma. And as the film ends, many Ju/'hoansi are imagining a different life. ...

  • Kalahari Family, Part One: A Far Country

    Thus Oma Tsamkxao, a Ju/'hoan hunter of the Kalahari Desert, recalls his first encounter with the ethnographic filmmaker, John Marshall, in 1951. John, his sister, and their parents had come to the Kalahari to study the last independent hunter-gatherers in southern Africa. A FAR COUNTRY documents the lives of the Ju/'hoansi engaged in their ancient economy based on hunting game with poisoned arrows and gathering wild bush foods. The film also chronicles the early years of a relationship between the Marshall family and the Ju/'hoansi that would last for more than a half century. In their own words, ≠Oma, his wife !U, and members of their extended family relate their personal histories and describe Ju/'hoan society. ≠Oma recounts the tale of a days-long giraffe hunt. "Women do important things, just like men. It's we women who fed the people." And indeed, the Marshalls learn that bush-foods gathered by women and girls provided 80% of the Ju/'hoan diet. Ju/'hoansi were self-sufficient in the 1950s, but the old life was hard. "We were owners of thirst and owners of hunger," says ≠Oma. And as the film ends, many Ju/'hoansi are imagining a different life. ...

  • Kapitalism - Our Improved Formula

    Let us imagine that Ceausescu returned 20 years after his overthrow and execution, and compared the condition of the country at the time he had left with its present state of affairs. Let us imagine the reaction of the former Communist dictator when learning that Capitalism in Romania was built by some of the people most near to him, and that - generally - the Romanians think only about money, cars and consumption. The proposal might seem absurd or funny - and so it is. Because what else is post communist reality after all? After the Eastern European countries joined the EU, our recipe for capitalism might be successful in other parts of the world. ...

  • Kedi

    Kedi is an experimental documentary, of the type Cadavre Exquis – a game invented in 1925 by surrealist artists, where words and images are put together by a group where every participant has to contribute, either according to a previous rule, or by seeing the contribution of the one before them. Several people of Istanbul are captured in their imagination, thus creating a "moving" collective portrait. They create and narrate together the story of a cat's life. ...

  • Keep it in Mind

    One night in 1940 in the village of Ip in Transylvania, the Hungarian army killed 157 local Romanians in a retaliatory action. Since the 70ies, the anniversary of the mass murder has gained greater importance. The question is whether in the course of history the traditional coexistence of the Romanian and the Hungarian communities in this village can ever be restored. ...

  • Keep Quiet

    Former vice-president of the Hungarian extreme right party Jobbik and former member of the European Parliament, Csanád Szegedi has lived his entire life deeply influenced ideologically by anti-Semitism. In 2012, at the peak of his political career, he finds out that his mother’s side of the family is of Jewish descent. KEEP QUIET, a biographical documentary that blends in a classical fashion talking heads with archive footage, lays out the identity crisis Szegedi undergoes as a consequence of his paradoxical discovery, and observes his personal and public journey, once this former nationalistic political leader decides to actively join the Jewish community in Budapest, against which he had fervently militated in the past. Directors Joseph Martin and Sam Blair focus, on the one hand, on how collective hatred and xenophobia propagating mechanisms work, and, on the other hand, on the self-effacing effects it has on the victims, leaving the viewers to decide whether Szegedi, a natural born performer of a questionable credibility, is being truthful or not about his transformation and newly found apologetic attitude ...

  • King's War

    History can take various guises and many of them are not truly accurate, as in the case of Michael I, King of Romania, whose real story had been distorted by Communist propaganda. With the help of archive images and a series of interviews with historians, researchers and the King himself, we are able to discover a facet of Romanian history of which many of us may not know. Historical truth is revealed, and we find out about the King’s struggle to strike a balance between domestic and foreign affairs, especially in troubled times, as World War II was at its peak. We can also note how the King continued to fight for this beloved country, Romania, even when he lived in exile. Supported by real facts and a personal testimony of the king himself, we can reconsider our views regarding the history of Romania and the life of its King. ...

  • Kismet

    Turkish soap operas have taken over the world, conquering the hearts of millions of viewers from the Middle East, North Africa, the Balkans and Asia. This documentary leads us in the backstage of this film industry and reveals the secrets of its tremendous success, which transcends religion and culture. From the midst of the sets where the most popular shows are being filmed, the camera moves to the real spaces, the streets and houses of Cairo, Abu Dhabi, Istanbul or Mostar, to uncover the way in which the creators of such shows have brought into discussion the taboo subjects of the oriental world, thus trying to help women in the fight for their rights and liberties. ...

  • Kiya

    Kiya is a virtual reality piece telling the story of two sisters’ valiant but unsuccessful efforts to try to rescue their third sister, Kiya, from a deadly attack by her ex-boyfriend. Using two separate recorded calls to emergency workers, the experience puts the viewer on scene as the tragic events unfold. With three women killed every day by their intimate partners in the United States, Kiya is ultimately a call to action: this should never happen to anyone’s sister again. Nonny de la Peña's work is known to explore how the use of space in a narrative can influence the experience. The viewer’s first-person perspective triggers empathy and an intense sense of connection with the characters. In this way, the author hopes to raise awareness of the global problem of domestic violence. ...

  • Koriam's Law and the Dead Who Govern

    The old man walks along the line of people waiting to receive him, leaning heavily on a cane. He shakes each proffered hand, moving closer, filling more and more of the frame. He looks to camera, and says, "Will I shake your hand too?" For a moment, it seems as though the question has been put to the viewer. But a voice off-screen answers in the affirmative, and a hand emerges from beneath the camera, taking the old man's and shaking it firmly. This instance, which blurs the line between viewer and film, filmmaker and subject, is typical of the documentary Koriam's Law - and the dead who govern. This is the story of the Kivung in the town of Pomio, an influential religious and political movement, called by some a 'cargo cult', on the island of East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. ...

  • Krasna Malanka

    The inhabitants of the local village Krasna, on the territory of Ukraine, are getting ready to celebrate Malanka. This traditional yearly celebration is an important event for everybody, but especially for the young, representing a form of rite of initiation. At night, the group goes from house to house and make pranks or perform small plays in which each member of the group has a certain role, and the entire action is led by a young bachelor dressed as a woman. ...

  • Kusum

    Kusum is an ordinary, 14 years old indian girl. She lives in Delhi, where she goes to school and wonders about her future - she falls ill. She stops eating, isolates herself and suffers raving fits. Evil spirits have attacked the family, says Bhagat, an old healer. Kusum's family initially tries western medicine, but then opts fot traditional indian spiritual healing. It is long road, for spirits are not easy adversaries. Kusum is the toching story of a family's fight against bad luck, poor conditions and disease. ...