Centrul Astra Film

 

 

Astra Film Festival

Film catalogue

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  • Cabal In Kabul

    Dan Alexe's film captures in an unconventional manner, life in Afghanistan after the Talibans. A freelancer journalist, the author lived in Kabul for a long period of time, and learned the Persian language. Among many other stories he heard in all these years, one of them was about the last two jews living in Kabul. The two hate each other, and consequently divided the synagogue betwen the two of them. Isaac Levy sells amulets and casts spells on soldiers and on barren women. Zabulon Simantov produces alcoholic drinks for the black market, and sells the product to Isaac's customers. The two last jews live in constant conflict. The author creates an intimate film, full of humor and humanity. ...

  • Cabal In Kabul

    Dan Alexe's film captures in an unconventional manner, life in Afghanistan after the Talibans. A freelancer journalist, the author lived in Kabul for a long period of time, and learned the Persian language. Among many other stories he heard in all these years, one of them was about the last two jews living in Kabul. The two hate each other, and consequently divided the synagogue betwen the two of them. Isaac Levy sells amulets and casts spells on soldiers and on barren women. Zabulon Simantov produces alcoholic drinks for the black market, and sells the product to Isaac's customers. The two last jews live in constant conflict. The author creates an intimate film, full of humor and humanity. ...

  • Cachilo, Poet of the Walls

    For about twelve years, the artist Cachilo lived on the streets of Rosario city, in Argentina. During this time, he inscribed his unique poetry on the city walls. For many Rosarineans, Cachilo became an emblem of dignity and freedom. The documentary follows the traces left by Cachilo on the walls of Rosario and in the minds of the Rosarineans. ...

  • Café-Finovo

    The film attempts to change our perception on death, presenting the story of the first German café located in a cemetery - Café-finovo. Within the walls of the cemetery Alter St. Matthäus from Berlin where Wilhelm Grimm is buried among others, one can find artists and story-tellers involved in the cultural life of the café while enjoying its famous cakes. Café-finovo hosts various events not related to death or mourning: literary mornings, concerts, exhibitions and other leisure activities. The film tries to answer the question: if cemeteries existed for the living more than for the dead, would we accept more easily our own death and limitations? ...

  • Cairns

    The mountain is as much a place of initatiom as of mystery. Cairns (cosmic altars) have existed for centuries as signs which link the earth and sky, man and cosmos. ...

  • Calcutta Calling

    Business Process Outsourcing is the fastest growing industry in the world. In India, over 350,000 people are currently working in call centers. Vikeeh Uppal, or "Ethan Reed," is one of them. He works in a busy calling center selling cell phones and fire extinguishers to customers in America and Great Britain, although he has never been out of Calcutta, Vikhee, alias Ethan, works hard to be a top seller. He gets tutoring in English language, learns pronunciation from commercials and movies, and watches English soccer games to get a better understanding of the people he calls every day. In the meantime, he is determined to keep to Indian values and customs, although he is intensly exposed to Western culture and consumerism. ...

  • Calcutta Calling

    Business Process Outsourcing is the fastest growing industry in the world. In India, over 350,000 people are currently working in call centers. Vikeeh Uppal, or "Ethan Reed," is one of them. He works in a busy calling center selling cell phones and fire extinguishers to customers in America and Great Britain, although he has never been out of Calcutta, Vikhee, alias Ethan, works hard to be a top seller. He gets tutoring in English language, learns pronunciation from commercials and movies, and watches English soccer games to get a better understanding of the people he calls every day. In the meantime, he is determined to keep to Indian values and customs, although he is intensly exposed to Western culture and consumerism. ...

  • Călușarii from Bârla

    The dance of the Calus is the pride of the Balea village, in the Arges county. Gelu, the Bailiff, has “stolen” the ritual from his father, old Crivac, a local legend who, at 94, still burns with the desire to dance. For the Calusari, the Pentecost folk song is one of the very few occasions on which they can be admired by the whole village. But the tradition is about to break. Things are different now and the Calusari find it more and more difficult to gather. Will they be able to overcome rivalries and obstacles in order to dance the Calus? What starts as a recording of a tradition turns into documenting a fading custom and a plea for the importance to perpetuate national values. The Calus in Barla is struggling not just with the new generation’s lack of interest, but also with aging and even with the human nature. The ritual is alive as long as the dancers are. ...

  • CAMP

    The youngest are 9 years old, the oldest 17. Holidays have to teach them discipline and willpower. Each of them has to deal with increased effort, stress, and their own weaknesses. ...

  • Caravane

    A journey across one of the largest sand deserts in the Sahara area is a tough enterprise. The only way to do it is by camels, as no car can get through. A man's job, one would think. Anthropologist Ingrid Poulsen was intrigued to hear the story of a caravan lead only by women which set out for this dangerous journey every year in September. The film follows the women's caravan, observing the preparations of the journey, and traveling with them all the way for six whole weeks in an attempt to understand why these women have chosen to lead this kind of life. ...

  • Carmen Meets Borat

    A film about a girl form Glod, the village where “Borat” was shot. The lead character, Carmen Ionela Ciorobea was selected by Mercedes Stalenhoef, the Dutch filmmaker, to be the subject of the film one year before Sacha Baron Cohen came and filmed there as if it was Kazakhstan. In the poor village, girls marry at 14 or 15, and Carmen was considered, at only 17, a spinster. Her family is doing better than the rest, owns a small shop and the boy courting her turns out to be more interested in her money. Carmen watches the telenovelas, speaks some Spanish and dreams of going to Spain. The filmmaker intended to follow up with her for another two or three years, but this storyline goes second when, after one year, Carmen’s father and grandfather star in “Borat”! The entire village stirs up after watching the movie, and foreign lawyers come with the possibility for the family to get huge amounts of money as damages. ...

  • Carpatia

    The Carpathians link the Alps with the Balkan Mountains like a spinal cord extending from Central Europe to the East, and branching off as far as western Ukraine. A journey to the rural regions of the Carpathians is an opportunity to encounter ethnic groups with weird names such as the Hutsul or the Gorals, to meet people who still live according to ancient customs and believe in wizards, to see traditional trades alive, and to realize that, as strange at it may seem, everything is part of a common European cultural heritage. This documentary is a poetic journey portraying people, places and the spectacular landscape of the Carpathian Mountains. ...

  • Cartoonists - Foot Soldiers Of Democracy

    12 lovable lunatics, capturing the comic and tragic in all four corners of the earth: cartoonists who risk their lives to defend democracy, with a smile on their faces and a pencil as their only weapon. ...

  • CDPL Story

    CDPL – “The Literary Bookmaker” is an unusual publishing house. Three literary enthusiasts want to promote literature in this way: alongside Nora Iuga and other collaborators, the three of them are releasing bold titles and contemporary literature, in spite of a rigid and elitist system of book distribution. This documentary is a self-reflective “bet” meant to promote the publishing house, but also to stir a unique literary cultural form of activism. ...

  • Changa Revisited

    Mixing contemporary footage with photos and sound-recordings from the 80s, the ethnographic documentary CHANGA REVISITED addresses the past-present dynamics within a Maasai community from Tanzania, formed around the current pater familias, Toreto di Koisenge. The everyday life of Toreto’s family, living out of herding livestock and subsistence agriculture, reflects, on a small scale, the impact that the larger socio-economic changes from the region have had on the preservation of their traditional way of life. Filmmakers Leonard Kamerling and Peter Biella have an approach akin to the participatory tradition; the close relationship they seem to have developed with the members of this community they’re revisiting after 30 years is a key factor in accounting for the latter talking openly in front of the camera about their concerns in regard to the widespread alcoholism among men, the increase of poverty and domestic violence, the dissolution of the Maasai solidarity, and about their worries related to the children’s limited access to education. An intimate and immersive family portrait, focusing on the texture of community ties and on conveying how a specific sense of rhythm of life is threatened by incertitude, which captures from a mature anthropological perspective how globalization reshapes topical worldviews. ...

  • Changes

    After spending most of his adult life in Denmark, Kwabena wants to move back to Ghana, the country that he left more than 30 years ago. This film, by his daughter, chronicles one of his journeys to Ghana in preparation for his definitive return. It follows him as he reconnects with his old friends and his ancestral home. The questions, that subtly unfold within the film, touch upon the profound dilemma often felt by long-term immigrants, many of whom are no longer certain where „home" is. „Changes" explores the motives that drive immigrants back to their place of origin and the implications of such return. ...

  • Char... the No-Man's Island

    Ten years ago, a flood of the Ganga river destroyed the Rubels’ house. An island was formed from the river's waters, a no man's land the inhabitants called Char. Rubel and his family, together with other homeless people, decided to settle on this barren and desolate strip of land. Rubel is 14 and his dream is to return to his old school in India and go on with his studies, but the reality forces him to make a living from smuggling rice on the Ganga, at the border between India and Bangladesh. The summer is almost ending, the weather is changing and the river threatens to flood again and wipe out the small and fragile island. Despite this, Rubel smiles and says "Char may disappear, but we won't". ...

  • Charity Salesmen

    Seven young Austrians, two Germans and one Hungarian work as paid fundraisers for the Malteser Relief Organization, an organization similar to the Red Cross, in the backwoods of Bavaria. It looks like a holiday camp, but it is hard work. Every morning they drive to their designated area, walk, walk, walk and ring houndreds of door bells trying to reach the hearts of the citizens. Their mission is to convince as many people as possible to make an annual donation to the organization by direct debit. They get paid according to their results. If they don't inscribe any new members, they don't earn a cent. This game has winners and losers. Some give up, while others quickly become clever sales people of charity. ...

  • Chat with Alice

    CHAT WITH ALICE is a palimpsest-portrait of a 19-year old girl who works in the field of video chat in order to support her little boy, Aristo, and her husband Dorian, who is 35 years older than her. Both of them are visual artists, giving Aristo the chance to grow up in a creative environment, among drawings and paint brushes. On the other hand, Alice’s job and Dorian’s mental disorders risk jeopardizing the home of the “Floyd family”. On a reflexive note, the film crew joins Aristo’s games, while, in the background, the parents are trying to find a common ground and mutual understanding. Isabela Țenț’s documentary plays upon the contradictions between Alice’s persona from the chat room and the normative expectations we might have in regard to motherhood. ...

  • Check Check Poto

    Mosaique is a community youth center based in Aubervilliers, a suburb of Paris focusing on 12 to 17 year-olds. Check Check Poto offers a glimpse into the life of this unique place where tenagers come and go freely, without having to pay or enroll, as regularly or irregularly as they please. They come to be listened to, to be informed and even to be supported in case of difficulties. Or they come simply to make an appearance and just be there. The film records and reconstructs the unspoken words. Behind the closed doors of this refuge, Check Check Poto draws an engaging, but harsh panorama of young people desperately searching for self-esteem. ...

  • CHEMERICAL

    From the creator of the award winning film "Garbage! The Revolution Starts at Home" (Sundance Channel, Super Channel) comes a shocking tale about the products we use to clean our homes and bodies. "Chemerical" explores the life cycle of everyday householder cleaners and hygiene products to prove that, thanks to our clean obsession, we are drowning in sea of toxicity. The film is at once humorous, as we watch the Goode family try to turn a new leaf by creating and living in a toxic free home, and informative, as director Andrew Nisker works with many experts to give audiences the tools and inspiration to live toxic free. Chemerical tackles the "toxic debate" in a truly informative and entertaining way, not only by raising awareness, but most importantly, by providing simple solutions. ...

  • CHERNOBYL FOREVER

    25 years after Chernobyl we have almost forgotten the risks inherent to nuclear power. The consequences of this disaster have still not been mastered. Recent events in Japan show that we have not yet learned our lesson when it comes to this type of catastrophes. Atoms have a long life, and men have a short memory. This heretofore unseen film about Chernobyl is here to remind us. ...

  • Childhoods of Longocampo

    Childhoods of Longocampo represents the omnibus collection of the documentary films created during CINEIMPACT International Film Academy, that took place in the region Campulung Muscel in 2014. The omnibus film explores various facets of childhood stories, circumstances and perceptions, beyond the conventional age and social norms that teach us where, when and how our childhoods begin and end. CINEIMPACT Film Academy is an international program dedicated to Creative Documentary and Visual Anthropology. The filmmakers that created in the framework of CINEIMPACT program are students or graduates of MA and Phd programs in Film and Visual Anthropology, coming from countries such as Germany, Netherlands, Italy, Sweden, Hungary, Brasil, Croatia, England, Greece and Romania / ...

  • Children of the Decree

    In October 1966 Nicolae Ceausescu siged Decree no. 770, which made abortions illegal in Romania. The punishment was imprisonment. The only exceptions were women over 40 and those who had at least 4 children in care. For the Dictator, the decree was the birth certificate of the New Man, obtained through racial and ethnical purification. In reality, Ceausescu symbolically signed his own death sentence: "after a quarter of a century, he was going to be killed by the very children born at his own command". Born on command is above all a testimony aimed to prevent people from forgetting and repeating the mistakes of the past. ...

  • Children, Kosovo 2000

    Albanian children in Kosovska Mitrovica confess the deepest pains they have experienced in their short lives to the camera. They witnessed how their parents were tortured or killed, and sometimes these children even had to bury a parent by themselves. It is terrifying to hear children relate such horror stories and it is even more terrifying to think that they have actually lived those nightmares. These gruesome stories are amplified by the many images of the area devastated by the war - deserted villages and completely ruined houses, in which some of the children must live. Overall, it is a picture of the absurdity of conflict and its most innocent victims. ...

  • Chimney - Sweep

    They know all the buildings in the city by their roofs. They can find their way to the chimney doors hidden in the attics. On the street, they cannot pass unnoticed, as people turn their heads to look at the top hats they wear as a sign of their trade. Chimney sweeps are proud of their work. It is a risky activity which requires fearlessness of heights, and which demands skills that very few possess. This film follows the daily routine of the chimney sweeps, as well as the superstitions related to their image as luck-bringers. Although they might seem out of time, there still is plenty of need for their profession. ...

  • Chimney - Sweep

    They know all the buildings in the city by their roofs. They can find their way to the chimney doors hidden in the attics. On the street, they cannot pass unnoticed, as people turn their heads to look at the top hats they wear as a sign of their trade. Chimney sweeps are proud of their work. It is a risky activity which requires fearlessness of heights, and which demands skills that very few possess. This film follows the daily routine of the chimney sweeps, as well as the superstitions related to their image as luck-bringers. Although they might seem out of time, there still is plenty of need for their profession. ...

  • Christian End

    A young man finds out he has AIDS and commits suicide. As if the tragic loss were not enough, his family is confrunted with the refusal of the Orthodox Church to bury him in the Christian ritual. The suicide is denied forgiveness and the right to a "Christian end". The film attempts to analyse the conservative position of the Church in this matter. ...

  • Christmas For Horses

    Ever since lately in the village of Veliki Izvor which is famous for breeding pure-blooded horses, there was a celebration on the day of Sf. Tudor. For the sake of good health and fertility of the horses a lot of magical activities were performed. The most important of them was leading the horses around the fire. The purpose of this was to purify them, protect them from any disease and keep the fertile. At last a horse-race is organized. ...

  • Christmas-tide-Dreadful Nights

    Festivities played an important role in the peasants' life of the village of Vokhtoma. Christmas-tide that included a number of various ritual games remained popular till the midtwentieth century. This film depicts the oldest and most tenacious fragments of fortune-telling, round-dancing games and walking mummers masquerades that were arranged both indoors and outdoors. The participants dressed themselves up as a bear, a crane, Satan, an old woman - "dirty mummers", and as "good, pure mummers" - a horse, "a youth", a barin (landlord). The northern winter landscapes, original and unembellished scenes of life, villagers' festive clothes, costumes and disguises prepared by the peasants with inextinguishable fantasy, natural and open - hearted laughter, jokes, dances, chastushkas - all this gives the film singularity and energizes spectators for a whole year. ...

  • Chronicle Of A Disaster Foretold

    A mining company wants to reopen the gold and silver exploitation from Certej Mine, Hunedoara county and build two draught lakes based on cyanide. The people whose land is about to be poisoned are determined to fight till the end. The mining company stops at nothing to hide its real intentions. And the authorities have downright reasons to support the company. A story about people who don't want their land to be poisoned, a story about companies and businesses for which humans don't matter, a story in which the political and financial interests are above everything. "The chronicle of a disaster foretold" tells the story of a company that, when got stuck in plan A - Rosia Montana, goes to plan B - Valea Frumoasei and the gold mines from Certej. At the end of the movie, from the last frame before the credits, we will find out who this mining company really is. ...

  • Chronicle, A

    Director Slavomir Popovici’s documentary, made in 1973, put Toader Hrib’s chronicle on film. Toader Hrib was a peasant from the Arbore village, Suceava County, Romania, who founded a local museum. By watching the documentary, one can tell that talking in front of the camera comes natural to him. He is at the level of the greatest Romanian folk storytellers. However, the director complements his considerations with starkly contrasting modern footage. The result is a unique documentary that combines anachronism with technological progress in the most unexpected, expressive ways. www.slavomir-popovici.ro ...

  • Chuck Norris vs Communism

    At the end of the 80s and the beginning of the 90s, over-the-top action heros of the 80s meant the world to the Romanian viewers newly introduced to the VHS. In the last days of the communist regime and in the years after its falling, there were no legal video stores in Romania, nothing but a unique kind of piracy that brought about a cultural revolution: in the long nights, Romanian youth would gather and watch five movies in a row. Chuck Norris, Jean Claude Van Damme and all the glorious figures of B movies helped them get a taste of the free world. However, director Ilinca Calugareanu’s documentary film is more about an unassuming hero – a dubbing translator whose shrieky voice has come to epithomize the sweet taste of that revolution. Working with the most basic technology, she dubbed hundreds of films and her voice has turned into a character itself. ...

  • Cici

    Petru is a Roma man from a village in Romania. His nickname is Cici. He earns his living with his puppet, the "Capra". But his request for a permit to perform in the streets of Lausanne, Switzerland, is denied because of some complaints about the snapping sound of the Capra. The film chronicles Cici’s life, his run-ins with the authorities, his multiple bonds with his family and the rapport he develops with the Swiss people who provide assistance to Roma migrants. Filmmaker Yann Bétant shows with humour the process for obtaining a street artist license and the absurdity of an administrative system that refuses so modest a request. The closeness of his relationship with his subject gave the director access to engaging cinematographic points of view to illustrate a man, a city and also a system. ...

  • Cine Verite

    Constantly looking for things to shoot, Agapi uses film saved during other productions to record everyday moments. This is a selection of ordinary moments from 45 years ago: people buying things from a kiosk, high school students hiding for a smoke, children burning fallen leaves, students in the street, a man pushing a cart up on a hill, a family reuniting on a train station platform, the Husi fair, the train station in Brno (Czechoslovakia), a student dorm, the student bar at the House of Youth in Iasi, a party in a restaurant. ...

  • Cinema, cinema

    Hundreds of people crowd at the gates of a film studio, to put their names on the audition list, hoping to get a part in a movie made by a famous Iranian director who uses non-professional actors. At first sight, "Cinema, Cinema" is a film about the making of a film. However, the viewer gradually discovers that some of the applicants are the main characters and learns what drives them so badly into filmmaking. A subtle analysis of Iranian society. ...

  • Cinema, mon amour

    Inspired by the same child-like love of movies’ magic as “Nuovo Cinema Paradiso”, “Cinema, mon amour” tells the story of a present-day Don Quixote and his fight for the survival of the cinema theatre he has worked in as a manager for the most part of his life. Victor Purice is a natural-born entrepreneur. Unabashed by the ramshacke building and the virtualy non-existent audience, he makes plans to resuscitate the cinema to its former glory. Meanwhile, life goes on like in a private household. The manager and his two female employees cook their meals, have dinner, and reminisce about good old times. They treat the sporadic spectators as guests coming to visit, offering them blankets and hot tea when the cold becomes unbearable in the unheated theatre. Yellow-tinted images and melancholic monologues portray a nostalgia for bygone times, when going to the movies was social glue. However, “Cinema, mon amour” carefully avoids falling into pessimism, focusing rather on the unlimited quantity of energy the passion for cinema is able to unleash. ...

  • City of the ants

    Emerging from the desert surrounding Lima (Peru) the 1500 urbanised acres of Villa El Salvador have already achieved world-wide fame. This self-organised slum, where 350000 people live, is considered a model for Latin America. ...

  • City Play

    The project MiniMedina ('mini-city' in Arabic) aims to create a simulated real-size city scenario for children, helping them to learn about the mechanisms of a city, and prompting them to imagine the ideal city and their role in society. The screen is split in two, each part showing the constrasting roles children have in the city and how they change as they grow up. It is a technique both interesting and meaningful for a documentary experimenting with the thin line that distinguishes play from reality. ...

  • City Tour

    The film captures aspects of three famous areas of Bucharest city, dangerous places but at the same time fascinating, where marginals live - Ferentari, Gara de Nord, Griviţei. The documentary follows the distribution of free syringes to the inhabitants of these neighbourhoods. ...

  • Clara B.

    Through archive images, news and authentic pictures from the beginning of the 20th century, the film tells the fictionaty story of Clara B., photographer and reporter, an independent and strong woman - born in Strasbourg in 1901 and who lived her life between France and Germany. Another fictional character, Jonas, museum curator, recomposes her existence. He discovers Clara B. through the documents donated to the museum where he works. A meditation on the memory of archives and the history of the 20th century. ...

  • Clay Watching

    Piscu village, located 38 km from Bucharest, used to be known all over Romania as the village of pottery artists. Dumitru Constantin is one of the last three remaining masters who still work with clay. He reveals the secrets of his art, a fascinating but dying tradition. ...

  • Clinical Romance

    62 year old Hao Hebbinghaus has two passions: taking pictures of every moment of his life and collecting objects that relate to all sorts of memories. Despite this, he feels very lonely, so one day he decides to call his ex-wife, from whom he had separated ten years ago. His plan is that the two of them spend the evenings together, but they gradually find out that the years of separation have changed them completely. ...

  • Close to Heaven

    Dumitru Stanciu is one of the last mountain shepherds of Europe. As his forefathers did for thousands of years, in summer as in winter he and his herd of sheep roam the far reaches of the Transylvanian Carpathian Mountains, close to the edge of heaven... Vivid stories and fantastic myths, far from the world of today, cinematically narrated over the course of a year. ...

  • Cold Waves

    Cold Waves tells the story of the strange alliance between a nationalist-communist dictatorship and international terrorism. It is a film about the war between Radio Free Europe and the Ceasescu regime who went as far as hiring Carlos de Jackal to annihilate key-people who worked for the Free Europe Radio Station. The film also makes an analysis of the power of media in the modern world. ...

  • Coming Face to Face

    Three years after the death of her mother, director Sára Haragonics makes a home-movie film diary, documenting intimate moments spent with her father, brother and boyfriend during their summer vacation. By alternating present-day scenes with home-movie footage from the family archive, this highly personal documentary questions how we cope on an emotional level with something as painful as the passing of one’s mother and wife, the way we face guilt mechanisms, and, especially, what inner springs can one still find inside the family to overcome pain and accept the absence. The physical space of the Haragonics’ and that of the places they (re)visit abroad work as a backdrop laden with Proustian madeleines, highlighting a family’s attempt at keeping alive in their hearts their mother’s and wife’s presence while life inevitably carries on. ...

  • Coming to Light

    Edward S. Curtis was a driven charismatic, obsessive artist, a pioneer photographer who set out in 1900 to document traditional indian life. He created an enormous body of work - 10,000 recordings, 40,000 photographs, and a full lenght ethnographic motion picture. When Curtis began photographing Indians, he believed that their cultures were vanishing. When he finished in 1930, his own work vanished into obscurity , then was rediscovered in 1970s and helped to inspire the traditional on many reservations. Coming to Light tells the dramatic story of Curtis's life, the creation of his monumental work and his changing views of the people he set out to document. The film also gives Indian people a voice in the discussion of Curtis's images. Descended from Curtis' subjects or who are using his photographs for cultural preservation respond to the pictures, tells stories about the people in the photographs, and discuss the meaning of the images. ...

  • Commemoration of Gabor

    On the first day of November, people from Transylvania celebrate "The Day of the Dead". They bring flowers to the graves of their beloved ones and light candles. The film shows an unusual celebration, in a Gypsy family. The Gabors are not some ordinary Gypsies. They are wealthy people and the rest of the community looks up to them as aristocrats. They gather to commemorate old Gabor, the charismatic patriarch of the family. Following their tradition, they drink and sing by the grave, to the astonishment of the other people in the cemetery. ...

  • COMMON GROUND

    The film retraces the life of an apartment building in Bucharest, an authentic witness of the social and economic consequences of a Romanian society in complete transition. It evokes the stories which have animated the lives of its inhabitants - almost all of them are owners. In this invitation to "come inside", the audience discovers the characters with their stories, their lifestyle, their own set, and also their everyday life as owners: bills to pay, pipes to repair, a mafioso administrator, noisy neighbours, solidarity networks developing. The film describes life stories very realistically, as they are lived today in Bucharest. ...

  • Confessions of Thomas Quick

    With no less than 39 brutal murders on his conscience, Sture Bergwall, also known as Thomas Quick, came to be known as Sweden’s most horrifying serial killer. While being incarcerated at Säter, the psychiatric hospital, since 1991 for armed robbery, Bergwall confessed the murders to the therapists of the institution one after another, covering almost all of the unsolved murder cases of Sweden at that time. The story took an extraordinary turn: in 2008 two Swedish journalists (Rastam and Kuttin) decided to re-examine the 50,000 pages of therapy notes, court documents and police interrogations, and came to the conclusion that there wasn’t any evidence for any of the cases other than Bergwall’s own confessions, many of which had been made while he was taking high doses of tranquilizing drugs. After the journalists confronted Bergwall with their conclusion, he admitted that all his confessions were false, to the huge embarrassment of the Swedish police, psychiatric establishment and judiciary. Bergwall was cleared of all the murders, and later released. ...

  • Constantin And Elena

    A bittersweet love story. Where "sweet" is the love (after 55 years of marriage), "bitter" is the lack of time left for the "sweet" (the old age), and "story" is the everyday life. A film about the ancestral, pure way of living and loving. A cinematic, observational, sometimes voyeuristic look at a way of life and a life itself, both, almost extinct. ...

  • Construct

    "Construct" is a visual essay on the dynamicsof the architectural structure designed in 1934 in Bucharest by Marcel Iancu, a member of the Dada movement. ...

  • Conversation with Dundiwuy Wanambi

    This is a personal film about Dundiwuy Wanambi over the years that Ian Dunlop has known and worked with him. It is made up mainly of interviews filmed with Dundiwuy Wanambi at Yirrkala and at his Marrakulu clan centre at Gurka’wuy be­tween 1970 and 1982. It reveals something of the struggles of one man in the face of the huge changes brought about by the coming of the Nabalco bauxite mine and the mining town of Nhulunbuy to the Gove Peninsula. ...

  • Cooperworking in SantaClara del Cobre

    The craft of copper-work developed successfully in the last decades, entering new markerts with new products. But the copper-workers are now facing the severe consequences of world-wide recession. Their comments accompany the film, in which their craft is shown. ...

  • Copsa Mica, Dudu's Dark Town

    Copsa Mica is a small town in the heart of Romania with a population of 6000. For decades the town has been completely covered in soot, emitted whilst producing carbon black for the European tyre market. Copsa Mica's location in a valley made it ideal for Nicolae Ceausescu to establish heavy industry. His motives were as simple as they were cruel; the emission would stay in the valley, and wouldn't harm the rest of the country. This little black town has had the questionable honour of claiming to be the most polluted town in Europe. After the revolution there was a large clean-up but not suffice to make Copsa lose it's bad reputation. Copsa's dark past has yet to be cleansed. A few years before Romania would join the EU, the question was how Copsa had endured the post-Ceausescu period and whether the town was ready for the new era to come. In the documentary 'Copsa Mica, Dudu's Dark Town' a few citizens are accompanied in 2003 - the year of the local elections-and in 2007 when Romania joined the EU. The main character is Daniel Tudor Mihalache, in Copsa better known as simply 'Dudu'. He is a successful retailer with one burning ambition: to be elected as Copsa Mica's next Mayor. He has great plans for the city despite all difficulties and ultimately wants to change its image. How will Dudu bring Copsa back to life in preparation of joining the 'New Europe' ? 'Copsa Mica, Dudu's Dark Town' is a profound and passionate story of ordinary people in a very devastating environment. It gives an intimate insight with humour and compassion of how to face the town's imperative gloomy past, but still look for the brightness of tomorrow's future. ...

  • CORPUS

    Corpus is a film-essay about the human body, about the body's representation in painting and graphics, about the body before the great passing away, the death. The stages suffered by the body becoming a corpse are emphasized using dance, music and painting, documentaries images within the world history. The bodies, or better said, the corpses, have no identity of sight, of gestures, of a smile. This film is a continuous pursuit of something different about corporality,the essence of the body becoming a corpse, the immortal soul. In other words, this movie draws the way of the soul trapped in the daily cage represented by the body. ...

  • CORVIN VARIATIONS

    The so-called Corvin Project initiated in 2003 was the largest and most awarded Central European city development project. It envisioned the full transformation of cca. 22 acres in Budapest's 8th district, which implied the demolition of all buildings in that area. Both the local government and the investor wanted to get rid of the “slums” by relocating more than one thousand families - among them many Roma people - who could not afford buying property in the old-new area. The protagonists of Corvin Variations are all local residents who have been relocated in the course of the project - and who recall, with nostalgia and criticism, the life in the old neighbourhood and community. They no longer see each other - they meet only in the reconstructed space created by the filmmakers… ...

  • Cotroceni Museum

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  • Counting Lambs

    Franz Plotzer har been a shepherd for several decades. While he crosses with his flock of sheep the park of the german city Kassel, both him, and the passersby in the park have to answer certain questions. The shepherd's seem philosophical, they are about life and labour, while the others are simply asked how many sheep they think are in the flock. Some attempt a guess, others even try to count them. A film with gentle-sweet irony, about the "transhumance" through a park famous for building a bridge between baroque architecture and nature. Amusing and ingenious, the documentary suggests an ironic comparison between life and sheep. ...

  • Crazy

    Crazy is a film about violence in which violence itself is not explicitly shown. The film focusses on the experiences of a number of Dutch UN soldiers in various hotbeds across the world, but the horrors in Korea, Cambodia, Lebanon and Bosnia are brought to life mainly by their personal accounts. Heddy Honigmann spoke with the "blue helmets" in their domestic surroundings. The material showing the regions involved consists of photographs and home movies that were shot by the soldiers themselves. The vehicle of their recollections is the music they played at the time, which they will forever associate with their war memories. Crazy demonstrates that Holland also has its "Vietnam's veterans", men who took their war experiences back home and need a long time to cope with them. The film makes us realise the madness of war, raises questions about the usefulness of so-called peace missions, and shows the power of music as a means to survive in extremely difficult situations. ...

  • Crazy Horse

    CRAZY HORSE follows the rehearsals and performances of the Crazy Horse Paris for a new show, DÉSIRS, staged by Philippe Decouflé, a celebrated French choreographer, as well as the backstage preparations of the dancers (make-up and costume fittings) and the various issues involved in the planning of the show and the administration of the cabaret. (Zipporah Films) Frederick Wiseman, a master of editing film content, splendidly captures on camera a world as it has never been seen before, depicting a fresco of the illustrious cabaret in Paris at the “Crazy Horse” nightclub. Known for its prestigious shows since 1951, “Crazy Horse” baffles its customers with a spectacle of lights, exquisite physiques, and breathtaking choreography in an atmosphere of vintage burlesque. A curious and tactful contemplation, Wiseman’s film unveils the total preparation for the luscious shows, from auditions and rehearsals to the entire administration of the club, while “topless girls […] gleefully disrobe, glove by glove and stocking by stocking (Jenny Barchfield, Associated Press).” A delicate ingress into the club reveals how nakedness is turned into a true art form, as Crazy Horse builds on the very idea of femininity, elegance, and nature of performance. The club’s philosophy relies on the dancers’ grace, hard work and glamour. With cultivated professional distance to his work, Wiseman prompts a storm of applause for the place as the star of the show. “Substance, captured with style… Crazy Horse […] is a reminder of what a documentary can be (A. O. Scott, The New York Times).” ...

  • Crime Unpunished

    The film is about Béla Biszku, Communist ex-Minister of the Interior , who was one of the masterminds of the bloody and cruel retaliations after the Hungarian Revolution in 1956. Biszku was in office between 1957 and 1961, and from his position he demanded during Central Commission sessions of the Hungarian Communist Party more severe sentences and physical eliminations of the imprisoned revolutionaries. His ideas were put into practice, and the most ruthless reprisal followed. Béla Biszku retired in 1989. He did not give any interviews until 2009. The authors of the film managed to get to him and to make him speak, but finding out whether he had any remorse about the past or feels the need to appologize for what he did is a tricky business. ...

  • CROSSES OF THE SECULAR PLANTS

    Romania can enter the Guinness Book considering how the country lost industrial platforms built before and during the communist regime. After December 1989, Romanian authorities were quick to liquidate almost everything related to Ceausescu. In Iasi, the largest city on the eastern border of the European Union, one hundred thousand families lost their source of existence after the industry was liquidated. Secular factories were destroyed too. The documentary presents the situation of three major plants based in Romania. ...

  • Crulic - The Path to Beyond

    'The animated feature-length "Crulic - The Path to Beyond" tells the story of the life of Crulic, the 33 years old Romanian who died in a Polish prison while making hunger strike. The acclaimed Romanian actor, Vlad Ivanov, narrates the ironical voice over from the point of view of the victim. ...

  • Cuckoo's Nest

    Local people call the mental institution in Calinesti, Prahova a realm of hell, populated by "nightmare creatures, wastes of society, useless beings with a hideous appearance". The 270 inmates live in a closed space and are quite ignorant of the outside world. The guide around this place is Florin Trîmbitasu, a patient who knows that he will spend the rest of his life among his fellow-inmates behind the asylum walls. ...

  • Cultivating Death

    It is common belief in Western culture that you have to “let go” when a loved one dies. The sooner the better, as you must return to “normal life”. Some people, though, are not willing to “let go” so easily. For them, the social relationship with the deceased does not stop with the funeral. Cemeteries are social spaces, where the living interacts among themselves and with the dead. The film, shot at a Victorian cemetery in London, explores the different ways in which people remember and commemorate their deceased family and friends. They tend their graves, bring flowers and presents, and talk to their dearly departed as if they were alive. The characters speak freely of their mourning, and about the critical moment in their lives when they had to part with a loved one, a moment we have all experienced or will experience sometime. ...

  • Czech Against Czechs

    In 2013, Czech filmmaker Tomáš Kratochvíl moves for a couple of months to Ústí nad Labem, in a building inhabited only by Romani, against his family’s wish. His experience as a Gadjo in the building owned by Jarda and Margita allows him to understand first-hand the everyday reality of Romani, a minority strongly stigmatized in the Czech Republic. He shoots handheld anti-Roma demonstrations – increasingly more numerous in 2013 throughout the country – as well as pro-tolerance demonstrations organized by NGOs and members of the Roma community. In CZECH AGAINST CZECHS, a doc-vlog in the spirit of reflexive and participatory documentaries, the camera works as a means of dialectically exposing predominantly unequivocal sides and attitudes in concern to xenophobia, as a source of acute social tension. At the same time, Kratochvíl’s and his family’s personal involvement in this experiment turns the camera in more than a tool for demystifying dangerous preconceptions that separate citizens of the same country, but also as a reconciliation device. ...